THE DEWEES FAMILY
Garrett Hendricks Dewees, b 1640 Netherlands, m 1662 Sijtske Lieuwes , arrived (NYC) 1664 , d c 1700 PA  
    Cornelius Dewees, b c 1682 New York City, m c 1706 Margaret Kuster, d c 1735 PA  
         Garrett Dewees, b c 1707 Germantown, PA, m c 1730 Mary, d c 1769, PA  
                William Dewees, b c 1733 Philadelphia, PA, m c 1759 Hannah Gearheart  PA, d c 1807 VA    
                       David Dewees, b 1766 PA, m 1787 Jane Harry,  Botetourt  County VA, d c 1834 Putnam County, IN      
                              Thomas Dewees, b 1798 Knox Cnty, KY, m America Oatman 1825 Putnam Cnty, IN, d 1864 Lavaca Co, TX                                                                                                   Ira Adelbert Dewees, b 1847 Dundee, IL, m Georgia Kerr 1871 San Antonio, TX, d 1932 W. Palm Bch, Fl          
                                           Robert Adelbert Dewees, b 1874 San Antonio, TX, m Margaret Long 1897 Keswick, VA, d 1958 W P Bch, Fl                                                                                                 Adelbert Long Dewees, b 1897 Chicago, IL, m Eunice Cone 1922 Titusville, Fl, d 1988 Titusville, Fl              
                                                          Adelbert Cone Dewees, b Eau Gallie, Fl, m Mary Redding Fl, gatorgma@cox.net 189672 

Gerret Hendricks Dewees                                           GENERATION ONE

Birth: 1640
Leiden
Zuid-Holland, Netherlands

Death: 1701
Germantown
Philadelphia County
Pennsylvania, USA


Emigrated to America (United States) about 1662/63. Lived in what is now New York City between 1663 and 1690.

Purchased property in 1691, as per copy of deed annexed. 

Deed from Herman op de Graff to Gerrett Hendricks de Wees. 

By these Presents be it known to all whom it may concern. THAT WHEREAS. Dirck Sipman at present residing in the city of Crefelt in the county of Cologne, did purchase of William Penn. Proprietor and Governor of the Province of Pennsylvania. Certain 5.000 acres of land in the said Province whereof he is at present in lawful possession and of which I Herman op de Graff by virtue of the full powers unto me for that purpose given. Do grant unto Gerrett Hendricks deWees under the yearly rent of two Rix Dollars or 2 pieces of Eight yearly forever. Certain 50 acres of land situate in the German Township part whereof consists in a Town lot of the breadth of 14 Perches and 4 feet. Bounded on the one side towards the South East by William Reittinghousen, and on the other side towards the North West by Dirck Keysers Land extending Westward to the Main Street and Northward to the German Township line and containing XXX acres and the remaining XX are situate amongst the said Germantown outside lotts extending and bounded also on the southeast by William Reittinghousen on the northwest by Dirck Keyser, Northward by the Township line, and Westward by the division street, and of the same breadth of XXX Perches Which 50 acres of Land situated as above I the said Herman op de Graff as attorney of (and in the name of) the said Dirck Sipman do hereby grant unto the said Gerrett Hendricks de Wees, Together with all the rights, titles and interests of the said Dirck Sipman of, in and to the same to the intent and purpose that the said Gerrett Hendricks de Wees his Heirs and Assigns hereafter forever possessing the same shall and may peaceably and unmolested, have hold and possess the same herein granted Land with any claim and demand of the aforesaid Dirck Sipman his Heirs and Assigns. On the other hand the said Gerrett Hendricks deWees hereby binds

Page 15 

himself his Heirs and Assigns yearly on the first day of the first month commonly called March to pay unto the said Dirck Sipman his Heirs and As signs forever, The said yearly rent of 2 Rix Dollars or 2 pieces of Eight the payment of which yearly rent to be made in the year 1691 on the first day of March . 

And lastly the said Gerrett Hendricks de Wees shall be obliged in order for the more better assurance of his right to the said (50) acres of Land to cause this present grant or a sufficient Extract thereof to be duly entered into the appointed Public Town Record. 

In Testimony whereof the Parties have set their hands and Seals hereunto. Done at Germantown 1690 the 1st day of the first month commonly called March. 

Witnesses. Herman op de Graff (Seal) Isaac Shumaker. Gerret Hendricks de Wees (Seal) Paul Wulff. Passed in the Court of Records ye 22nd. 9th. M. 1698. (Deed Book, I; 9, 218._Philadelphia, Pa.) 

According to the following, found in the Recorder's office in Philadelphia, the above lot of ground was sold by Zytian de Wees, widow of Gerret Hendricks de Wees, through her Attorney, Claus Rittenhouse, in 1701, to Conrad Cod Weis: 

THIS ENDENTURE made the 23d. day of December one thousand seven hundred and one between Claus Ruttinghuysen, lawful Attorney of Zytian de Wees widow of Gerric Hendricks deWees. on the one part, and John Conrad Cod Weis of Germantown on the other part, for and in consideration of 23 pounds current silver money of Pennsylvania a certain half lot containing 25 acres. and a further consideration of a yearly rent of six shillings to be paid to Dirck Sipman his Heirs and Assigns forever. Witnessed by Hans Senrussmirls. Peter Keyser. (Exemplification Records. I, 390.) 

Claus Ruttinghuysen, Attorney, etc., for Zytian de 

Page 16 

Wees, widow of Garrett Hendricks de Wees, sold the other half lot to John Henry Mehls, the same then being in possession of Zytian deWees, widow of Garrett Hendricks de Wees, for the sum of 17 pounds. Witnessed by Arret Klinkin and Peter Keyser. (Exemplification Records, 8, 392, L.) 

Deed from John Conrad Codweis to William Dewees. This Indenture made October 2nd. 1703. between John Conrad Codweis of Germantown county of Philadelphia, Province of Pennsylvania, on the one part. and William Dewees of the same Township, County and Province on the other part. WITNESSETH THAT THE SAID John Conrad Codweis for and in consideration of the sum of twenty seven pounds, current silver money of Pennsylvania which sum is secured to be paid by a bill of mortgage under the said William Dewees's hand and seal bearing date with these presents, the receipt whereof lie the said John Conrad Codweis doth hereby acknowledge, and for both acquit and discharge the said William Dewees his heirs and assigns forever. doth Grant, Bargain &c a certain half lot in Germantown March unto Gerard Hendricks de Wees by a deed of Enfoeffin dated the first of March 1690. acknowledged in open court March Conrad Codweis, by virtue of a deed of sale from the above mentioned Gerard Hendricks de Wees' widow Zytian dated the 18th day of April 1701. acknowledged in a court of records, held at Germantown 1703. 

John Conrad Weis. Exemplification records. No.8, p.386. Recorder of Deeds' Office, Philadelphia, Pa. 

This same land was sold by William Dewees to Conrad Rutters, on the 22d of 11th month, commonly 

"From the DeWees/Deweese/Duese newsletter"

"Garrett Hendricks de Wees" (1641 - ca.1700)
part III The Dutch period (1641 - 1663)
by Curtis Dewees & Jack C. Vaughn

"Gerrijt Hendrix of Amsterdam and Sijtske Liuwes in this town((Lieuwarden),have been announced the 14th,21st and 28th of September. Confirmed (married) same 1662.

Parents:
  Hendrick Adriaensz DeWees (1615 - 1679)
 
 Spouse:
  Sijtske Lieuwes Dewees (1649 - 1703)
 
 Children:
  Wilhelmina Dewees Rittenhouse (1673 - 1737)*
  Lieuwes Lambert Dewees (1674 - 1743)*
  William Dewees (1678 - 1745)*
  Cornelius Deweese (1682 - 1735)*
 
*Calculated relationship

 

Burial:
Upper Burial Grounds 
Germantown
Philadelphia County
Pennsylvania, USA

 
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

 
Created by: John Dawson
Record added: Sep 15, 2011 
Find A Grave Memorial# 76573214

Cornelius Deweese, Sr                                                               GENERATION TWO


Pennsylvania, USA

Death: Dec., 1735
Mount Joy
Lancaster County
Pennsylvania, USA


***Cornelius DeWeese (son of Garrett Hendricks DeWeese > and Zytian Liuwes was born 1682, and died Aft. 1735 in Philadephia, Pa.. He married Margaret Custer on 1708 in Germantown, Pa.

More About Cornelius DeWeese:
Christening: Dec 20, 1682, Dutch Reformed, New Amsterdam, New York City, Ny..

More About Cornelius DeWeese and Margaret Custer:
Marriage: 1708, Germantown, Pa.

Children of Cornelius DeWeese and Margaret Custer are: 
+Garret DeWeese , b. 1708, Gernamtown, Old Philadelphia, Pa., d. 1767, Berks, Pa. 
John Johannes DeWeese , b. May 29, 1710, Bensalem, Bucks, Pa.. 
Christine DeWeese ml, b. 1711, PerkiomenTwp., Old Philadelphia, Pa.. 
Catrina DeWeese , b. Sep 4, 1711, Southampton, Bucks, Pa.. 
Cornelius DeWeese , b. Bef. 1713, New York, NY. 
William DeWeese , b. 1714, PerkiomenTwp., Old Philadelphia, Pa.. 
XX Cornelius DeWeese , b. 1716, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa., d. Jan 1751/52, Philadephia, Pa.XX 
Samuel DeWeese , b. 1718, Berks Co., Pa, d. 1777, Near Allentown, Berks Co., Pa..

***Notes for Cornelius Deweese 
Cornelius Dewees was presumably the son of Garret Hendricks de wees who settled in Germantown, Pa in 1689 with his 3 sons and one daughter, Wilhelmina who married Nicholas Rittenhouse. His second son, Cornelius, born in Holland, settled in Skippack township in the Perkiomen region, on a farm which he and his brother William bought in partnership in 1708. He married Margaret Koster or Kuster and had several children.
Cornelius Dewees chose the occupation as farmer and took up residence in what is now Montgomery Co. His descendants are scattered throughout PA, OH and other states having amassed fortunes by tilling the soil.
In 1708 Cornelius moved to the Van Bebber tract, which comprised what is now Perkiomen Township. Both Cornelius and his brother William sent their children to the school taught by Francis Daniel Pastorius at Germantown.
In Rupps collection of 30,000 names of emigrants to PA:
First Settlers at Gemantown 1683-1710.

********************************************************. 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Gerret Hendricks Dewees (1640 - 1701)
  Sijtske Lieuwes Dewees (1649 - 1703)
 
 Spouse:
  Margaret Custer Deweese (1690 - 1753)*
 
 Children:
  Garret Deweese (1708 - 1769)*
  John Johannes Dewees (1710 - ____)*
  Cornelius Dewees (1713 - 1826)*
  Samuel Dewees (1715 - 1777)*
 
 Siblings:
  Wilhelmina Dewees Rittenhouse (1673 - 1737)*
  Lieuwes Lambert Dewees (1674 - 1743)*
  William Dewees (1678 - 1745)*
  Cornelius Deweese (1682 - 1735)
 
*Calculated relationship

 

Burial:
Unknown

 
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

 
Created by: BONNIE & CLYDE DEWEESE
Record added: Sep 02, 2013 
Find A Grave Memorial# 116457470

Baptismal Records for brothers Cornelius and William "DeWease", sons of Garrett and Mary. From records of St Gabriel's Episcopal Church, Douglassville, Amity Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania. William born Jan 1733; Baptized July 29, 1753.
GARRETT DEWEES                                                                    GENERATION THREE

GARRETT DEWEES 17.CORNELIUS DEWEES      7.GERRET HENDRICKS DEWEES    

 2.HENDRICK ADRIAENSZ DE WEES    1.ADRIAEN HEYNDRICKS DE WEES

 

    Garrett Dewees, a son of Cornelius and Margaret (Kuster) DeWees was

born about 1710. He married Mary ------- about 1730.

 

Children of Garrett and Mary DeWees.

 

102.  (1). Henry

        m. Elizabeth Hughes

 

103.  (2). Cornelius               b. Mar 22, 1731

            m. Elizabeth Jones Dec 26, 1752.

 

104.  (3). William                 b. Jan 01, 1733

 

105.  (4).  Elizabeth              b.         1735

         m. James Burns  May 03, 1754.

MORE:

  • Garrett Deweese, son of Cornelius and Margaret Kuster Deweese. He was born in Pennsylvania. His brother John was baptized in 1710, so Garrett was probably born sometime around then. Don't you love the accuracy of all this? His father was a farmer, his uncles and cousins mill-owners.

     

    He married Mary Unknown, probably in the late 1720s. (Their first child was born ~1730.)
    Second son Cornelius was baptized at St Gabriel’s Episcopal Church in Douglasville in 1731. (I believe this was later part of Berks County, which was formed in 1751.) Son William was baptized in the same place in . . . well, my notes say 1753, but that seems like quite a stretch. The books about the Deweese family (by La Munyan and Bayless) say he was born in 1733, so I think someone, probably me, made a typo.
           St Gabriel’s Episcopal, Douglasville
           Deweese, Cornelius 22 Mar 1731 - Garret & Mary 
                  William Jan 1753 - Garret & Mary (probably 1733)
                  John 2 Feb 1753 - Cornelius & Elizabeth
                  Elizabeth 1755 - Cornelius & Elizabeth
                  Paul, Frederic G. Berks County, Pennsylvania, births, 1705-1800. (Reading, Pa. : HP Pub., c1988-)
                  Another source, John T Humphreys, lists Elizabeth Deneese - parents Cornelius and Elizabeth - as being born 9 Oct 1754 and being baptized in St Gabriel’s Episcopal in Amity. Possibly Douglasville was an early name for - or suburb of - Amity???

     

    I haven’t found documentary information for the rest of the children - yet? And the two Deweese books do not agree. He and Mary may have had 5 children altogether (Bayless lists 3, La Munyan 4 - but a slightly different mixture):

            Edward, born about 1730 (Bayless)
            Cornelius, born 22 March 1730/31 (La Munyan)
            William, born 1 January 1732/33 (both)
            Elizabeth, born 1735 (La Munyan)
            Henry, born 1746 (both)

     

    That seems quite a gap between Elizabeth (1735) and Henry (1746), but I have no explanation for it.
    Note - from D. Johnson, Nov 2010 - she includes John b 1744 and Paul on the list of children, and omits Edward.

     

    In 1734, he is listed as one of the people who owned land in Philadelphia County:

     

    Hanover Township
    Cornelius De Wees 24
    Garret De Wees 100
            Rupp, 30K Names, Appendix 1, p. 430

     

    In 1752, he and his son? Cornelius were in Berks County (Robeson Twp):
           Garrett Dewese - Robeson
           Cornelius Dewese - Robeson
                  Williams, Richard T. And Mildred C Williams. 1752 list of taxables, Berks County, Pennsylvania. (Danboro, Pa. : Williams, [1976?])

     

    Garrett and Cornelius were still in Robeson for the 1754 tax list: 
           Robeson                acres?        tax
           Garrett Denese        20        5
           Cornelius                10        26

     

    In 1767, only Garrett was still in Berks County, but he had moved to Reading Town, where he had a house and a town lot. (This information has been reprinted in several places; it comes originally from the Pennsylvania Archives, 3rd series.)

     

    He is not on the 1779 Pennsylvania septennial census for Berks County, which is next list I have found at the Historical Society Library. There may be other places to look. But he supposedly died in 1769. Nothing more is known of him.

     

    Of the children:
    Edward - nothing more known
    Cornelius bp 1731 - married Elizabeth Jones on 25 Dec 1752 - 2 children, John & Elizabeth (baptized Douglasville, above)
          (he may have gone to Virginia? There is a Cornelius on the tax list of 1775 for Botetourt County.) 
    William bp 1733 - married Unknown - 4 children, Edward, Garrett, William, Henry

     

    email from D Johnson, 28 November 2010 - information from her grandfather:
    William DeWeese 1733-1807 - married Hannah Nellie Gearhart (m Berks Co, PA 1757) - moved to Montgomery Co, VA - children: Mary, William, Samuel, David, Thomas, Jesse, Eleanor - son Jesse Grand was administrator of will - moved to Kentucky - several children moved to Butler Co, Ky - later on to Illinois, Missouri. There is a William Deweese (also Hannah, David and Jesse) on the tax lists in Virginia.

     

    Elizabeth - married James Burnes on 3 May 1751. nothing more known.
    Henry, our next ancestor - married Elizabeth Hughes in 1768 - 9 children.

     

    Back to Father Cornelius 
    Back to Deweese Home Page
    Back to Home

     

    Forward to next ancestor, Henry Deweese

     

    Questions, comments, additions, corrections?  Contact me at: lee@leesgenes.com

    Page last updated 4 April 2011

  •  

 BACK

Garett DeWeese From http://leesgenes.com/deweese

 

 

 

CaWinkler19 originally shared this on 04 Apr 2014

LINKED TO

GARRET DEWEESE 

SAVED BY (10 OF 40)

SAVE TO MY TREE

COMMENTS

CANCELSAVE

Title  Required

Details                                     What kind of media is this?                                                                          Portrait                                     Place                                     Headstone                                     Document / Certificate                                                                          Other                                 

William Deweese                                                                          GENERATION FOUR

Birth: Dec., 1730
Montgomery County
Virginia, USA

Death: 1807
Philadelphia County
Pennsylvania, USA


Gabriel Ancestors Who Served in the American Revolution 
: Battle of Yorktown. Source:
MARTIN ARMSTRONG (1740-1808)

Served as: Colonel, Surry County North Carolina Militia

Descent: Martin Armstrong > Thomas Temple Armstrong > Jane B. Armstrong > Eliza Jane French > Isaac A.B. Smith > Effie Frances Smith > Bernice Mary Libel Gabriel
**********************************************************************
Battles:

Cherokee War of 1776-1777 
Col. Martin Armstrong commanded a regiment of Surry County militia that accompanied General Griffith Rutherford on what is known as the Rutherford Expedition or the "Rutherford Trace" -- a 300-mile slash-and-burn campaign that has been compared to Sherman's March to Atlanta. See the testament of William Lenoir in the pension files at this link: 

For historical background
Battle of Camden, August 16, 1780

Battle of Guilford Court House, March 15, 1781

Before the war, Martin Armstrong was one of the founders of Surry County, NC. After the war, the 1790 Census shows him living with is wife, Mary Ann Tate, in nearby Stokes County.

Gen. Martin Armstrong became Surveyor General of the Northwest Territory, and as such became immediately embroiled in the political battles and scandals that surrounded the distribution of land grants to veterans of the war. Land grant reform became one of he hot issues during the election of President Andrew Jackson.

Armstrong moved to Tennessee, where he became one of the original surveyors and founders of the city of Clarksville, Tennessee. He died at Nashville, TN in 1808.

Above: George Washington's Headquarters at Valley Forge, a house that once belonged to the Dewees Family, has been fully restored and may now be seen at Valley Forge National Park.


WILLIAM MEHLS DEWEES SR. (1711 - 1790)

Served as: Sheriff of Philadelphia County, and his son

WILLIAM FARMAR DEWEES JR (1739 - 1809)

Served as: Lt. Colonel of Pennsylvania militia and the owner of "Mount Joy Forge," Valley Forge, PA.

The Gabriels are not direct descendants of these two William Deweeses -- the Gabriels are descendants of cousins who were also named William Dewees Sr. (1732-1807) and William Dewees Jr. (abt. 1779 - 1812). Both lines descend from sons of Garrett Hendricks Dewees (1640 - 1701) who immigrated ca. 1690 and died in Philadelphia.

Thus the Gabriels are only laterally related to the owners of Valley Forge, but the Dewees family from Germantown, PA, is a colorful and well-connected one that certainly deserves special mention. Through them, the Gabriels of St. Joseph, MO are related (as distant cousins) to Gen. George Armstrong Custer and to architect Benjamin Latrobe, the man who designed the Capitol building in Washington, D.C.

Descent to Gabriels 

The Gabriels of St. Joseph, MO descend from Gerret's youngest son, Cornelius: Gerhard (Gerrit) Hendricks De Wees > Cornelius Dewees > Garret Dewees > William Dewees Sr. (1732 - 1807) who married Hannah "Nelly" Gearhart > William Dewees Jr. (1779 - 1812) who married Mary "Polly" > Peter Deweese > Andrew Jackson Deweese > Leona Deweese who married Isaac A.B. Smith > Effie Frances Smith > Bernice Libel Gabriel

See the pedigree at the Gilkey family site:

Descent to "Valley Forge" Deweeses
The Dewees family who owned the house and forge at Valley Forge, PA, stem from Gerret Hendrick De Wees's third son, Willem: Gerret Hendrick Dewees > Willem Dewees (Papermaker) > William Mehls Dewees Sr. (Sheriff) > Lt. Col. William Farmar Dewees Jr., who married Sarah Potts, daughter of Joseph Potts, the original owner of the forge.

See the article "Who Was William Dewees Sr.?" at the Dewees Family History site:

Charles Baker has provided some wonderful photographs, profiles and a well-done pedigree at his own blogspot, Below: Valley Forge National Park, seen from the air.

Descent to Benjamin H. Latrobe, architect=====.

Benjamin Henry Latrobe (1764-1820), the "Father of Ameican Architecture," descends from a grandaughter of Willem Dewees (Papermaker). Put a different way, Latrobe's mother, Anna Margareta Antes, was the niece of William Dewees Sr., the Sheriff of Philadelphia, PA, and a first cousin to William Dewees Jr., the owner of the forge at Valley Forge:

Gerret Hendricks Dewees > Willem Dewees > Christina Elizabetha Dewees (1702-1782) who married her father's business partner, a brilliant architect, named John Henry Antes (1701-1755) > 11 children, including Col. Frederick Antes and his sister, Anna Margareta Antes who moved to England and married the Rev. Benjamin Latrobe > Benjamin H. Latrobe. 
For a Wikipedia article on Benjamin H. Latrobe's life:
For an article by William Hughes on "Latrobe's Pennsylvania-German Family": 

Dewees Soldiers in the Revolution
The Dewees family are "Old Dutch" who settled in Germantown, PA, ca 1690. Many of the members of this family were Quakers, and therefore they do not appear on the military rolls.

For a listing of Dewees men who did serve as "Soldiers of the American Revolution, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania" see (at the bottom of this web page): 

The Lt. Col. William Dewees who owned and operated "Mount Joy Forge" better known as Valley Forge, was a Quaker. Because the iron works were essential to the war effort, he was commissioned with the honorary title of Colonel, but it appears that he did not fight in any battles.
Further Reading
For the History of Valley Forge Ownership, see:

For the Descendants of William Dewees, see:
Another good source: Richards, Henry M. The Pennsylvania-German in the Revolutionary War 1775-1783 (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1991, orig. published 1908) pp. 453-455

For more background on early members of the Dewees family (Garret, Cornelius and William Dewees) who settled in Germantown, PA, see the free Google Book: "On the Frontier with Colonel Antes" (pp. 22-24). All one has to do to get the book is Google the title.

The same book provides an interesting history of the Dewees Family and Valley Forge on pages 481-482.
*********************************************************************
J. PETER DINGESS (1738-1809)

Served as: Artillery man, Col. Trigg's Battalion, Lafayette's Corps

Descent: Johan Peter Dingess > Mary "Polly" Dingess > Napoleon Bonaparte French > Eliza Jane French > Isaac A.B. Smith > Effie Frances Smith > Bernice Mary Libel Gabriel

Battles:

Battle of Point Pleasant, October 10, 1774

(also known as "Lord Dunmore's War") under General Lewis.

Battle of Yorktown, October 19, 1781

Photo of grave stone:

MATTHEW FRENCH (1732-1814)

Served as: Private in Montgomery Co., VA, Militia, under Capt. Thomas Shannon, Maj. Joseph Cloyd's Company, Col. William Preston's Battalion

Descent: Matthew French > David French > Napoleon Bonaparte French > Eliza Jane French > Isaac A.B. Smith > Effie Frances Smith > Bernice Mary (Libel) Gabriel

Battles:

Battle of Wetzell's Mill, March 6, 1781
rom "A History of the New River Settlements and Contiguous Territory" by David E. Johnston, Chapter 4:

"Cornwallis' march into upper Carolina had greatly alarmed the Virginians and General Greene wrote letters to Governor Jefferson and to the various commanders of detached bodies of troops in Virginia asking help, and among those to whom he addressed his urgent appeals were Preston, Sevier, Shelby and Campbell. Colonel William Preston on February 10, 1781, ordered the militia of Montgomery County to assemble at the Lead Mines, and on the day appointed three hundred and fifty men assembled pursuant to the order of their commander.

"Major Joseph Cloyd, assembled and led the Middle New River men. It is to be regretted that the names of the men who went with Preston and Cloyd have not been preserved. One company went from the Middle New River valley, which was commanded by Captain Thomas Shannon, of Walker's Creek, and one of his lieutenants was Alexander Marrs. A few names only of the privates who went along have been secured. They were Matthew French, John French, Edward Hale, Joseph Hare, Isaac Cole and Thomas Farley.

"Preston began his march on the 18th day of February and reported to General Greene on the 28th day of that month, who assigned him to the command of General Andrew Pickens. On his way to report to Pickens he seems to have gotten between the American and British outposts, and camped for the night in close proximity to the British without knowing that they were near him.

"On the second day of March, 1781, Lee's Legion and Preston's men had a spirited encounter with Tarleton, which General Greene in a dispatch to General Washington thus notices: 'On the Second, Lieutenant Colonel Lee with a detachment of riflemen attacked the advance of the British army under Tarleton and killed and wounded thirty of them.'

"On the sixth of March at Whitsell's (Wetzell's mill), North Carolina, Williams' men, Pickens and his command, including Lee's Legion and Preston's Backwoodsmen, met the British and a severe engagement took place. The Americans were compelled to retreat, and Preston's horse took fright and ran through a mill pond near the British, threw Preston off and escaped into the British lines. Colonel Preston, being quite a fleshy man, found it difficult to keep up with the retreating army, and Major Cloyd seeing his condition dismounted and gave Preston his horse.

"On the eve of going into this battle John French, son of Matthew, and a member of Captain Shannon's company, was detailed as one of the guards to the wagon train. So soon as the firing began at the creek French left the train. Without orders -- in fact against orders --and went to the fight, joined therein and shot one of the enemy. The officer in charge of the wagon train reported him for disobedience of orders, and demanded that he be court martialed. Major Cloyd remarked that as French ran not from the fight, but towards it, if they court martialed him for such a cause, he would never again draw his sword in behalf of the country."


Battle of Guilford Courthouse, March 15, 1781
"The Americans continued their retreat to Guilford Court House, where the main body of Greene's army had assembled to fight Cornwallis. In the meantime, Colonel William Campbell with about sixty men had joined General Greene, and Preston's Montgomery men were placed under his, Campbell's, command on the extreme left of Greene's army. Colonel Tarleton says, in his Southern Campaigns pp 241, "That in the battle of Guilford Court House he held the right of the British army and that his troops were badly hurt by the Backwoodsmen from Virginia, that they stood behind a fence until the British Infantry with their bayonets climbed over the same."
"The Americans were defeated in this battle, and there were some criticisms as to the behavior of these Backwoodsmen or militia, and Colonel Preston in a letter to Governor Jefferson, written on the 10th of April, 1781, complaining of this criticism, and the injustice to his men, says, "that part of the men were in one action and all of the men were in two actions." Judge Schenek, in his "North Carolina 1780-81," credits Colonel Martin Armstrong with leading a body of Surry County men in the battle of Guilford Court House.
After the close of this battle the militia returned to their homes, which were then threatened by Indian incursions, their services being badly needed along the frontier to suppress the Indian forays and outrages."
JESSE HALL (1760-1848)

Enlisted February 1776 at age of 15.
Served as: Private in Dutchess Co. NY militia under Capt. Nathan Pierce, attached to Colonel Richmore's 1st NY Line, Gen. Alexander McDougal's Brigade.
Descent: Jesse Hall > Freeborn Hall > Rozena Hall > Leona Elizabeth Deweese > Effie Frances Smith > Bernice Mary (Libel) Gabrie
Battles:

Battle of Long Island, August 27, 1776

Battle of White Plains, October 28, 1776

Re-enlisted, April 1777

Jesse Hall and Asa Hall served as privates in Col. Morris Graham's NY Regiment of Levies, Capt. Isaac Vail's Company of Dutchess and Ulster Co. Militia

Battle of Bemis Heights (2nd Saratoga) October 7, 1777

Col. Morris Graham's Dutchess and Ulster County militia served under Maj. Gen. Benjamin Lincoln's Division in Brig. Gen. John Glover's Brigade (the right wing of the battleline)

Surrender of Burgoyne at Saratoga, October 16, 1777

See the order of battle at:


Glover's Brigade fought at the Battle of Saratoga, which means Jesse Hall and Asa Hall were probably present at the surrender of Gentleman Johnny Burgoyne.

The amazing victory at Saratoga changed the fate of American history. See:
.americanrevolution.com/BurgoyneSurrender.
Picture of Jesse Hall's Gravestone:

JEREMIAH PATE (1754-1819)

Served as: Captain in a force of VA militia marched by Capt. Adam Clements from Bedford County to the assistance of Gen. Greene in South Carolina May 1, 1781

Source: Gwathmey, John H. Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution 1775-1783
(Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1987) p. 607

Descent: Jeremiah Pate > Catherine Pate > Rozena Hall > Leona Elizabeth Deweese > Effie Frances Smith > Bernice (Libel) Gabriel

Battles:

Battle of Point Pleasant, October 10, 1774

ISAAC SMITH (1745-1801)

Served as: Private, Culpeper County, VA, militia, Lafayette's Corps.

Descent: Isaac Smith Sr. > Isaac Smith Jr. > Benjamine Smith > Theodore Smith > Isaac A.B. Smith > Effie Frances Smith > Bernice (Libel) Gabriel

Battles:

Battle of Yorktown, October 19, 1781

Isaac Smith Senior appears in the Daughters' of the American Revolution Patriot Index, Volume I, page 626. 
Posted by Mark Shernick Labels: American Revolution >, Battle of Guilford Courthouse Tuesday, August 25, 2009

How the Grosh Family of Pennsylvania Saved the Union : Ethan Allen and Hosea Grosh, ca. 1849, before they left for San Francisco. Source: Nevada Historical Society

Bernice (Libel) Gabriel descends from the Grosh (Grusch) family of Lancaster County, PA, through her paternal grandmother Mary Augusta Halling, who was the daughter of Mary Beatrice Grosh (1825 - 1908).

Of the Grosh family, it has been said that they "saved the Union." This may sound like one of Mark Twain's tall tales, but there may be some truth to the story. With a few stretches, here and there.

Four years before the Civil War began, in 1857, two Grosh brothers, Hosea and Ethan Allen Grosh from Marietta, PA, discovered the famous "Comstock Lode" near Virginia City, NV. Without the money generated by this legendary ledge of silver and gold, the federal government might never have been able to pay for the war.

See the Wikipedia article on the Comstock Lode at this link:

The story of the Grosh brothers may be found in "Back-Trailing on the Old Frontier" by Charles M. Russell ( Cheely-Raban Syndicate: Great Falls, MT, 1922) at this link:
A more detailed and colorful telling of the story was reprinted by the Nevada Observer on 19 December 2005. This account was taken from Volume I of the History of Nevada (1912), edited by Sam P. Davis, Chapter XIII "Early Mining Discoveries" p. 361 ff:

Davis concludes (page 383): "The men who made the assay are both dead. The grave of one is in California, and of the other in Nevada, and neither themselves nor their descendants ever realized a dollar from their discovery, which added to the world's wealth over seven hundred millions of dollars and saved the American union in the Civil War."

More recent historians say the "real treasure trove" left by the Grosh brothers may be 80 plus letters they sent home to Pennsylvania, which vividly describe life in the gold camps of California and Nevada.

The letters were recently acquired by the Nevada Historical Society from a great-great-great grandson of their brother, Warren Grosh. "In quality and content, those letters rank among the very best for telling what life was like back then," said Fred Holaman, an expert antique dealer. "It wasn't for the weak-hearted or the weak-bodied 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Garret Deweese (1708 - 1769)
  Mary Deweese Deweese (1710 - 1775)
 
 Spouse:
  Hannah Nellie Gerrad Deweese (1733 - ____)
 
 Children:
  William Deweese (1761 - 1812)*
  David Deweese (1765 - 1836)*
  Jesse G Deweese (1770 - 1838)*
  Thomas Deweese (1771 - 1819)*
 
 Siblings:
  William Deweese (1730 - 1807)
  Cornelius Deweese (1731 - 1794)*
  Henry Deweese (1746 - 1831)*
  Paul Deweese (1748 - ____)*
 
*Calculated relationship

 

Burial:
Unknown

 
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

 
Created by: BONNIE & CLYDE DEWEESE
Record added: Sep 02, 2013 
Find A Grave Memorial# 116459680

VALLEY FORGE

The land which later occupied the Continental Army during the winter of 1777-1778 was originally part of the "Manor of Mount Joy" which was 7,800 acres of land granted to Letitia Penn Aubrey and her husband William Aubrey by her father William Penn, on October 24, 1701 for an annual rent of one beaver skin. They gradually sold off the property, selling the last 175 acres in 1730 to Daniel Walker, Stephen Evans, and Joseph Williams. This partnership soon became the "Mount Joy Forge," later becoming more commonly known as "Valley Forge." This was a complete ironworks: finery, chafery, bloomery, and a slitting mill. Pig iron was converted to billets; iron billets into bars; cast iron into wrought iron; and manufactured finished metal products. In the 1750's a sawmill was added and in 1757, the entire property was purchased by a prominent Quaker ironmaster, John Potts. He eventually added a gristmill to the property several years later.

Potts, Hackley & Potts was the firm operating the forge by 1767 — consisting of Joseph and David Potts (John Potts' sons) and their cousin, Thomas Hackley. On May 10, 1768 the forge was conveyed solely to Joseph. Isaac Potts, another son, became owner of the gristmill by 1773, and soon after built his stone house along Valley Creek near the Schuylkill River. David Potts built a summer residence himself nearby — he lived in Philadelphia — but this house was acquired by William Dewees, his brother-in-law, and Isaac Potts and William Dewees entered into a partnership owning the forge.

The forge on Valley Creek was a source of military materials with the arrival of war, and despite his being a Quaker, Dewees became a colonel in the militia and he and Isaac Potts devoted a large part of the production from the forge was for the war effort. The production of munitions from this location was cause for the British to make it a stop on their way to Philadelphia in 1777. On September 11, 1777, following the Battle of Brandywine, a contingent of British forces reached Valley Forge on September 18th. Reinforcements arrived on the 20th and that morning, they carried off the "rebel stores" and burned the forge and all the structures except the gristmill. (Which incidentally survived until 1843 when it was destroyed by fire.)

General Washington arrived at Valley Forge on December 19, 1777 with his troops. Other generals had found housing in various farms around the encampment area, and Washington found his own in the home of Isaac Potts, which he rented from its current tenant, Mrs. Deborah Hewes for a hundred pounds in Pennsylvania currency. Mrs. Hewes, whose first husband had been one of Isaac's brothers, moved in with the Dewees family.

 

David Deweese                                                                               GENERATION FIVE

Birth: Jul. 15, 1765
Berks County
Pennsylvania, USA

Death: Nov. 30, 1836
West Dundee
Kane County
Illinois, USA


David DeWEESE married Jane HARRY on November 28, 1787 in Botetourt County, Virginia

Jane HARRY was a daughter of Evan and Abigail ( ) HARRY. She was born about 1765 and died about 1834 in Putnam County, Indiana.

source: DeWeese Family Newsletter, (date NOT known), page 222
 
 Family links: 
 Parents:
  William Deweese (1730 - 1807)
  Hannah Nellie Gerrad Deweese (1733 - ____)
 
 Children:
  Jubilee Deweese (1788 - 1871)*
  Evan Deweese (1790 - 1854)*
  Thomas Dewees (1799 - 1864)*
  Elizabeth DeWees Hammer (1799 - 1869)*
  David R. DeWeese (1801 - 1876)*
  Mary Dewees Leatherman (1803 - 1889)*
  Asenath DeWeese Jones (1809 - 1860)*
 
 Siblings:
  William Deweese (1761 - 1812)*
  David Deweese (1765 - 1836)
  Jesse G Deweese (1770 - 1838)*
  Thomas Deweese (1771 - 1819)*
 
*Calculated relationship

 

Burial:
Dundee Township Cemetery West 
West Dundee
Kane County
Illinois, USA

 
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

 
Created by: genienuts 1976
Record added: May 30, 2009 
Find A Grave Memorial# 37709945

THOMAS DEWEES                                                                     GENERATION SIX

Thomas Dewees

Birth: Apr. 28, 1799

Death: Mar. 28, 1864
Lavaca County
Texas, USA

 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  David Deweese (1765 - 1836)
 
 Spouse:
  America Oatman DeWeese (1807 - 1888)*
 
 Children:
  John Oatman Dewees (1828 - 1899)*
  William Preston Dewees (1842 - 1905)*
  Thomas Dewees (1843 - 1905)*
  Helen Medina Deweese Irvin (1849 - 1917)*
 
 Siblings:
  Jubilee Deweese (1788 - 1871)*
  Evan Deweese (1790 - 1854)*
  Thomas Dewees (1799 - 1864)
  Elizabeth DeWees Hammer (1799 - 1869)*
  David R. DeWeese (1801 - 1876)*
  Mary Dewees Leatherman (1803 - 1889)*
  Asenath DeWeese Jones (1809 - 1860)*
 

*Calculated relationship

 

Burial:
Koonce-Ponton Cemetery 
Ezzell
Lavaca County
Texas, USA

 
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

 
Created by: Matt
Record added: Nov 20, 2011 
Find A Grave Memorial# 80761171

1870 United States Federal Census

VIEW

Name:Ira A Dewees

Age in 1870:21

Birth Year:abt 1849

Birthplace:Illinois

Home in 1870:Precinct 4, Atascosa, Texas

Race:White

Gender:Male

Post Office:Pleasanton

Value of real estate:View image

Household Members:

NameAge

J O Dewees40

Thomas Dewees28

William R Dewees30

Ira A Dewees21

H M Dewees18

Leonidas Dewees13

America Dewees60

1850 United States Federal Census

Name:Ira D Dewees

Age:4

Birth Year:abt 1846

Birthplace:Illinois

Home in 1850:Bastrop, Texas, USA

Gender:Male

Family Number:337

Household Members:

NameAge

Thomas Dewees50

America Dewees43

John O Dewees22

Eliza J Dewees18

Mary A Dewees11

William Dewees9

Thomas Dewees8

Isaac R Dewees6

Ira D Dewees4

Ellen M Dewees1

The Descendants of William and Isabella Mooreland Ponton decided at this year's family reunion as a special project we will be restoring this cemetery. These headstones will be repaired and cleaned and the cemetery will be beautified to the best of our ability...if you have any questions, please contact me...

Near the end of the Black Hawk War the Potowattomie Indians, a branch of the Algonquins sold what is now Dundee to Illinois in 1835 and by 1840 almost all of this land had been settled. The first settlers actually arrived in the area in the fall of 1834, seeing the wigwams and campfires along the river. Jesse Newman, his wife and Joseph Russell who were prospectors, built a cabin along the east bank of the river a little more than a mile south of what later became the town of Dundee. The Newmans and Russell stayed only a short time, but staked their claim and returned a year later.

In 1835 the Oatmans arrived and settled on the west side of the river, being one of the first settlers to arrive after the treaty. Reportedly, a drawing was held at the raising of the Oatman house to determine who would have the honor of naming the town. A young Scotsman name Alexander Gardiner won the honor and the town was named Dundee after his hometown in Scotland.

In 1837, Thomas Deweese, the son-in-law to Elder John Oatman, platted most of East Dundee. In 1837 Deweese built a gristmill, and soon after was responsible for the installation of the first bridge. In the 1850s, a large group of Lutheran Germans moved into the area. They erected a church and practiced their own traditions, which separated them from their largely Scottish western neighbors.[4] With the Chicago - Northwestern train line running through the center of town, East Dundee produced dairy and cheese. Prior to the train line all products were moved by horse and wagon to connect with the train which was about 7 miles north and a little west of town.
1860 United States Federal Census

 

NameThos Dause

Age63

Birth Yearabt 1797

GenderMale

Birth PlaceIndiana

Home in 1860St Maries, Refugio, Texas

Post OfficeSt Maries

Family Number189

Household Members

NameAge

Thos Dause63

America Dause53

Wm D Weese18

Thomas Weese16

Ira Weese12

Madina Weese11

Leonidas Weese3

John Casady27

Margaret Casady22

Jane Casady2

Mary Casady1

J C Waldrop

America Oatman DeWeese

memorial...

Birth: Oct. 26, 1807
Greenville
Floyd County
Indiana, USA

Death: May 5, 1888
Hays County
Texas, USA

 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Thomas Dewees (1799 - 1864)
 
 Children:
  John Oatman Dewees (1828 - 1899)*
  William Preston Dewees (1842 - 1905)*
  Thomas Dewees (1843 - 1905)*
  Helen Medina Deweese Irvin (1849 - 1917)*
 
*Calculated relationship

 

Burial:
City Cemetery #6 
San Antonio
Bexar County
Texas, USA

 
Created by: Suzy & Rob
Record added: Oct 30, 2014 
Find A Grave Memorial# 138043151

United Daughter of Confederacy Patriot Ancestor Album © 1999; pp78-79

Dewees and Oatman Families

  • When the families first met in the 1700 it was a male, husband family dynamic society.

  • John Oatman (b. 1787 d. 1875) married Nancy Nance (b. 3/22/1786 d. 1864) in Floyd County, Indiana. They had 16 children

  • Thomas Dewees, Sr. was thought to be a gentleman but yet very “odd.” Married America Oatman. The Dewees family moved to Texas in 1848 and settled first in the now Bastrop area. They finally settled in Seguin, Texas and had 12 children.

 

Thomas “Tom” Dewees, Jr.

  • Civil War Veteran Tom enlisted in the 32nd Regt. Wood’s Texas Cav. in San Antonio, Texas in May 1864. He was discharged at the age of 22 at Camp Mason on May 24, 1868.

  • 11 Year partnership with J. F. Ellision; they spent 6 months in driving 100,000 head of cattle north from Texas to Kansas

  • The Dewees Ranch was the first land to be fenced. It is thought that about 100,000 acres were fenced.

  • There is a recorded divorce between Thomas Dewees, Jr.  (b. 1828 ) and Kate Ham, his third wife. The first two wives died in childbirth. Tom raised the 3 boys and Kate raised the 3 girls (Olga, Claribel and Kate Graves).

  • Kate’s father, Ciaphus Ham resided in area of what is today known as Halletsville. He was a count and known Indian fighter. He is colorful character in the early history of Texas. He was stationed at the Alamo but not present during the battle because his boyhood friend, James Bowie, sent him and Rezin Bowie to Louisiana to obtain horses for the Texas army. Ham’s Bowie knife is on display at the Alamo. It may be the only original Bowie knife in existence.

  • Upon Tom’s death all inherited ranches in Wilson, Karnes and Atascosa counties in Texas.

Brother of Ira A Dewees
1.  DAVID DEWEES
2  JOHN OATMAN DEWEES
3.  ANN ELIZA DEWEESE
4.  ELIZA J DEWEES
5.  NANCY ELLEN DEWEES
6.  MARY A DEWEES
7.  WILLIAM PRESTON DEWEES
8.  THOMAS "TOM" DEWEES
9.  ISAAC R DEWEES
10. IRA ADELBERT DEWEES
11. HELEN MEDINA "ELLEN" DEWEES
12. LEONIDAS LEE DEWEES
IRA ADELBERT DEWEES                                                                     GENERATION SEVEN

Ira Adelbert Dewees

Birth: Jan. 2, 1848
Illinois, USA

Death: Feb. 12, 1932
Palm Beach County
Florida, USA

 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Georgia Ann Louise Jane Kerr Dewees (1847 - 1925)*
 
 Children:
  John William DeWees (1872 - 1880)*
  Robert Adelbert Dewees (1874 - 1958)*
 
*Calculated relationship

 

Burial:
Woodlawn Cemetery 
West Palm Beach
Palm Beach County
Florida, USA
Plot: Block 34, Lot 5 (S. 1/2) (South Section)

 
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

 
Created by: Carr0ts
Record added: Apr 21, 2008 
Find A Grave Memorial# 26174882

Georgia Ann Louise Jane Kerr Dewees

Birth: 1847
Texas, USA

Death: Apr. 21, 1925

 
Family links: 
 Spouses:
  Ira Adelbert Dewees (1848 - 1932)
  Lafayette Shannon (1835 - 1900)
 
 Children:
  John William DeWees (1872 - 1880)*
  Robert Adelbert Dewees (1874 - 1958)*
  Roberta Middleton Haygood (1886 - 1977)*
 
*Calculated relationship

 

Burial:
Woodlawn Cemetery 
West Palm Beach
Palm Beach County
Florida, USA
Plot: Block 34, Lot 5 (S. 1/2) (South Section)

 
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

 
Created by: Carr0ts
Record added: Apr 21, 2008 
Find A Grave Memorial# 26174893

Georgia and Ira Dewees with son Robert Adelbert Dewees and daughter-in-law, Katherine Spetzman
BIO OF IRA ADELBERT DEWEES' BROTHER

JOHN O. DEWEES,

SAN ANTONIO.

John O. Dewees, for many years identified with the history of western Texas, and a leading citizen and stockman of that part of the State, was born in Putnam County, Indiana, where the town of Greencastle now stands, on the 30th day of December, 1828. His parents were Thomas and America Dewees, natives of Kentucky, and respectively of Welsh and English and German and English descent. His father was a farmer and stockraiser, and died on his farm, near Hallettsville, in Lavaca County, in 1864. His mother died at San Marcos, Hays County, Texas, May 5, 1889.

Mr. Thomas Dewees moved, with his family, from Putnam County, Indiana, to Tasewell County, Illinois, in 1831 or 1832, and, four or five years later, located further north, on the Fox River, where the town of Dundee, Cane County, Illinois, now stands. Mr. John Oatman, Mrs. Dewees' father, laid off the village of Dundee, on the east side of the river, and Mr. Thomas Dewees on the west side, and the latter engaged in farming and established the first flouring mill erected in that section.

The country west of the Mississippi, at this time, contained few white pioneers. There were, in fact, camps of Sioux and Pottawottamie Indians situated within half a mile of the little frontier settlement, but the Indians were kindly treated and, as a consequence, made good neighbors. School facilities were meager and the subject of this sketch, John O. Dewees, had few opportunities to acquire an education. During the summer months he worked upon his father's farm, and as teamster, often hauled wheat and corn to Chicago, thirty-six miles west of Dundee, and then merely a government post, containing 200 or 300 inhabitants. In the long winter days he was a pupil at the little red brick school-house, and succeeded in acquiring the rudiments of an English education, which he improved and extended in after years, as opportunity offered. In 1848 the construction of the Chicago & Galena Railroad was commenced, and in the fall of 1849 it had reached Elgin, five miles below Dundee. John O. Dewees, then in his twenty-first year, was among the first of the people of that section to ride over and watch, as a deeply interested spectator, the wonderful work of railroad building. And well he might! Rude and imperfect as was this primitive railway, slowly uncoiling itself in the Western wilderness, it represented the highest embodiment of the genius of this utilitarian, iron, world-moving age! An invention second only to that of gunpowder. Gunpowder enabled civilization, at last, to hold barbarism at bay and to render evermore impossible such a catastrophe as that which engulfed Rome's 1,400 years of glory, art, literature and law, in the night of the middle ages. The railroad has made it no longer necessary for cities to be built where there are harbors, or on broad, navigable streams. Every great railroad is a Mississippi. The savage has been subdued; every fertile acre of the continent has been made accessible; the frontier, moving farther and farther westward, has at last melted into the Pacific, and lives only in tradition, and old-fogy ism has, amid the glare of new surroundings, been compelled to sit and blink in dark corners and inanely bemoan the good old times.

The railroad that young Dewees regarded with such natural and amazing interest, and upon which he rode at the first opportunity, was very far from being such a piece of perfect engineering as one of our modern trunk-line railways. The ties were placed five or six feet apart and on these were laid two stringers, and on the stringers nailed strips of iron, somewhat broader and thicker than the tire-iron used on wagon wheels. The engine and coaches were equally primordial and suggestive of the possibility of accidents, in a day, too, when the convenience of insuring, at short notice, against mishaps was a long way off in the impalpable future. The rails (or iron strips) often loosened, by spikes coming out, and the swelling of ties, had a penchant for assuming perpendicular or semi-perpendicular positions, and ripping holes in the bottoms of the coaches. These ragged pieces of iron were called snake-heads. The Chicago & Galena Railway was by no means the first road built in the United States, but it was among the first constructed in the West, and its appearance at Elgin was an event that made the day one of the dies notandi in Mr. Dewees' life.

In 1847 Mr. John Oatman and his two sons went down the Mississippi to New Orleans, from New Orleans (by sea) to Galveston, proceeded to Houston, procured horses and traveled as far west as San Antonio. On the homeward trip (made during the same year) they passed northward, through east Texas, and, taking passage, in Louisiana, on a Red River steamboat, made their way back to Dundee. They were charmed with what they had beheld of Texas, and united in urging Mr. Thomas Dewees to remove to the Lone Star State. Both Mr. Oatman and Mr. Dewees were afflicted with bronchial ailments, and it was their desire to establish homes at some healthful locality in the South. Accordingly, the two families (consisting of John and Nancy Oatman and their children, and Thomas and America Dewees and their children—John O., Eliza, Ellen, W. P., Mary Amnia, Thomas, Ira Adelbert, Isaac and Medina Dewees) left for Texas, in 1849, and, after an interesting journey (partly by land and partly by water), reached their destination and settled on Cedar Creek, twelve miles below the town of Bastrop, and engaged in farming and stockraising.

They followed the course of the Fox River in wagons to Peru. Illinois, the head of navigation on the Illinois River; there embarked on a steamboat and proceeded down the Iliinois and Mississippi Rivers to St. Louis; went by steamboat from that point to Natchez, Mississippi; at Natchez went ashore, and traveled overland the remainder of the way. They crossed the Red River at Nachitoches, the Sabine at a ferry near San Augustine, and the Brazos at Washington. The party struck the Colorado at La Grange, and wended their way up that river to Bastrop, where they crossed the stream and proceeded to the place of settlement on Cedar Creek. Mr. Thomas Lewees was in bad health and unable to perform physical labor. His eldest son, John O. Dewees, therefore, looked after the cattle and farm work, performing the larger part of it himself. When he came to Texas he had $160, and with this amount purchased cattle at $4 and $5 a head. He worked for his father on shares during the ensuing four years and cleared about $3,000.

In 1854, he went to Seguin, Guadalupe County, engaged in business speculations and, during the year, lost the hard earned $3,000 and found himself about $1,200 in debt. Nothing discouraged, he turned about, with undiminished zeal, to make another start, and in the spring of 1857, went to Live Oak County, purchased a few head of cattle on time, and worked on shares, his share being the fourth calf—payment that would now be considered grossly inadequate.

At the beginning of the war between the States he owned about 1,600 head of cattle. In 1862 he joined Company B, commanded by Captain E. B. Millett, Thirty-second Texas cavalry, commanded by Colonel Woods, and served in Texas and Louisiana, making a brave and efficient soldier. His command did not reach Lousiana until after the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, but participated in the fight at Blair's Landing and the twenty-five or thirty severe skirmishes, including the battle of Yellow Bayou, that marked the retreat of Banks' vanquished army. At the close of hostilities, his company was mustered out of service about twelve miles above Richmond, on the Brazos River.

The winter of 1864-5 was peculiarly severe and thousands of cattle died in west Texas. He gathered up what stock he had left, and purchased a number of herds, and soon laid the foundation for his subsequent fortune. Before entering the Confederate army he so disposed of his interest in cattle and lands that, when he returned home, he was able to realize there from a small amount of money. The price of cattle, immediately succeeding that winter, was lower than ever before, or since known, and he bought large numbers of cattle. In 1873, he sold his cattle, on the range, fo. $23,000, and moved to San Antonio, and has since made that city his home. At that time the market was not on a boom. Had he sold two or three years later, he would have realized at least $100,000 for his herds. At San Antonio he formed a copartnership with J. F. Ellison, of San Marcos. The firm, during the ensuing five years, speculated in cattle and bought and drove herds to Kansas, Wyoming and other markets in the Northwest, realizing large financial returns therefrom. Messrs. Dewees & Ellison severed their connection and the former formed a copartnership with his brother, Thomas Dewees, of San Antonio. They purchased and sold land and traded in cattle until they owned a ranch of 60,000 acres (under fence and well stocked) in Wilson, Atascosa, and Karnes Counties, and then James T. Thornton, at the time a banker in San Antonio, and now a resident of Kansas City, was taken into the firm. The new firm continued in business a number of years and, at the time of its dissolution, by the retirement of Mr. Thornton, owned 95,000 acres, also well stocked. The two brothers continued the business for about a year, and then dissolved partnership on account of the failing health of John O. Dewees. It was supposed that he could live only a few months, and they thought it best to have their affairs settled while both were living. The assets of the firm, at a fair valuation, were not less than $350,000. John O. Dewees has since been engaged in business on his own account. His ranch lies in Wilson and Atascosa Counties, and consists of 24,000 acres of land, stocked with 3,000 cattle, 2,600 of that number, steers. He owns lands in various parts of the State, a fine farm in Wilson County, and valuable property in and near the city of San Antonio, and is worth from $140,000 to $200,000.

In early life, when struggling toward independence, he shirked no labor, however arduous; often splitting rails and shingles, felling trees, and working waist-deep in water. Difficulties, even misfortune, served to increase, rather than diminish, his courage and resolution to succeed—to be one of those who conquer in life's struggle. The demands upon his constitution in those years was the cause of the apparent decline that led him to wind up his affairs at one time, in anticipation that the end of his earthly career was near at hand. His health since has been fully restored, and he is now a man of magnificent physique, and, although his hair and beard are silvered by the pencil of time, his carriage is firm and elastic. He is a man of strikingly dignified and courtly appearance, and would be marked in any assembly.

On the 12thof February, 1873, Mr. Dewees was united in marriage to Miss Annie Irvin, at the home of her mother, in Guadalupe County. They have one child, a daughter, Miss Alice A. Dewees, eighteen years of age, and now a student at Saint Mary's Seminary, at Knoxville, Illinois. Mrs. Dewees' parents were Jordan and-Sallie Irvin. Her father was a prominent farmer and stockraiser, and died many years ago. Her mother is still living in San Antonio. Mrs. Dewees received an excellent education, is one of the most talented ladies in the State, and presides over her palatial home with that rare and elegant grace that distinguishes cultured society.

Mr. Dewees is a Democrat, and has never voted any other than the Democratic ticket, but takes little interest in politics. He is a man of broad and liberal mind, and has aided in the promotion of many public enterprises. While not a member of any church, he is a man of warm and generous impulses, as is abundantly attested by his almost daily acts of charity. He is a fit representative of that sturdy race that made their homes in this State when Texas was a wilderness, and have, by the exercise of manly virtues, achieved success, using the word in its highest and truest sense—a goal that all men seek to attain, and that fitly rounds an honorable career.

SOURCE: 

Personnel of the Texas State Government: With Sketches of Representative Men of Texas

 

Lewis E. Daniell 

January 1, 1892

Maverick Print. House

John Oatman Dewees

 in the Alabama, Texas and Virginia, Confederate Pensions, 1884-1958

Name:John Oatman Dewees

Application Date:20 Mar 1928

Application Place:Wilson

Spouse:Mrs Annie Dewees

Marriage Date:12 Feb 1873

Marriage Place:Guadalupe, Texas

Death Date:10 Jun 1898

Death Place:Bexar, Texas

Pension File Number:43698

Application Type:Widow

ROBERT ADELBERT DEWEES

Robert Adelbert and Margaret Long Dewees

02 January 1897

Keswick, Virginia

Wedding Photo

Margaret Long Dewees

Birth: May 3, 1874

Death: Oct. 14, 1902

 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Isaac Long (1832 - 1915)
  Elizabeth H Mohler Long (1837 - 1906)
 
 Siblings:
  Louise Latrobe Long (1868 - 1957)*
  Bessie M Long (1868 - 1957)*
  David Grigsby Long (1871 - 1944)*
  Margaret Long Dewees (1874 - 1902)
  Thomas Long (1882 - 1882)*
 
*Calculated relationship

 
Inscription:
Wife of R. Adelbert Dewees
 
Note: Shares stone with Isaac, Elizabeth M., Louise & Bessie Long

 

Burial:
Grace Episcopal Church Cemetery 
Cismont
Albemarle County
Virginia, USA

 
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

 
Maintained by: Mary Ann M
Originally Created by: FDP
Record added: Jul 03, 2008 
Find A Grave Memorial# 28006258

Cook County, Illinois, Marriages Index, 1871-1920

Name:Robert A. Dewees

Age:41

Gender:Male

Birth Year:abt 1874

Marriage Type:Marriage

Marriage Date:23 Nov 1915

Marriage Place:Chicago, Cook, Illinois, USA

Spouse Name:Mrs. Cathrine M. Spetzman

Spouse Age:40

Spouse Gender:Female

FHL Film Number:1030610

1900 United States Federal Census

Name:Robert A Dewwes

Age:25

Birth Date:Aug 1874

Birthplace:Texas

Home in 1900:Chicago Ward 32, Cook, Illinois

Race:White

Gender:Male

Relation to Head of House:Head

Marital Status:Married

Spouse's Name:Margaret Dewwes

Marriage Year:1897

Years Married:3

Father's Birthplace:Illinois

Mother's name:Georgia Dewwes

Mother's Birthplace:Texas

Occupation:View on Image

Neighbors:View others on page

Household Members:

NameAge

Robert A Dewwes25

Margaret Dewwes24

Ad*But L Dewwes2

Georgia Dewwes51

Margaret Long Dewees and son Adelbert

about 1900

Chicago, Illinois

Mother and Son

Robert Adelbert Dewees

Birth: Aug. 18, 1874
San Antonio
Bexar County
Texas, USA

Death: Mar. 5, 1958
West Palm Beach
Palm Beach County
Florida, USA

 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Ira Adelbert Dewees (1848 - 1932)
  Georgia Ann Louise Jane Kerr Dewees (1847 - 1925)
 
 Siblings:
  John William DeWees (1872 - 1880)*
  Robert Adelbert Dewees (1874 - 1958)
  Roberta Middleton Haygood (1886 - 1977)**
 
*Calculated relationship
**Half-sibling

 

Burial:
Woodlawn Cemetery 
West Palm Beach
Palm Beach County
Florida, USA
Plot: Block 34, Lot 5

 
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

 
Created by: Mary Ann M
Record added: May 28, 2006 
Find A Grave Memorial# 14432314

 1920 United States Federal Census

Name:Robert A Dewees

Age:45

Birth Year:abt 1875

Birthplace:Texas

Home in 1920:West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida

Street:Clematis Avenue

House Number:525

Race:White

Gender:Male

Relation to Head of House:Head

Marital Status:Married

Spouse's Name:Cathern Dewees

Father's Birthplace:Illinois

Mother's Birthplace:Texas

Able to Speak English:Yes

Occupation:Keeper

Industry:Hotel

Employment Field:Own Account

Home Owned or Rented:Rent

Able to Read:Yes

Able to Write:Yes

Neighbors:View others on page

Household Members:

NameAge

Robert A Dewees45

Cathern Dewees45

Edna Spetzman22

Dorothy Spetzman20

John E Spetzman19

Second Marriage - Catherine M Mich Spetzman Family
Catherine's First husband, Henry John Stetzman, buried with unmarried daughter, Edna Marie Spetzman

Henry J Spetzman

Birth: 1864

Death: 1912

 
Family links: 
 Children:
  Edna M Spetzman (1896 - 1978)*
 
*Calculated relationship

 

Burial:
Saint Alphonsus Catholic Cemetery 
New Munster
Kenosha County
Wisconsin, USA

 
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

 
Created by: douglas kimberlin
Record added: Oct 18, 2014 
Find A Grave Memorial# 137412527

Edna M Spetzman

Birth: Mar. 16, 1896

Death: Sep. 8, 1978

 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Henry J Spetzman (1864 - 1912)

 

Burial:
Saint Alphonsus Catholic Cemetery 
New Munster
Kenosha County
Wisconsin, USA

 
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

 
Created by: douglas kimberlin
Record added: Oct 18, 2014 
Find A Grave Memorial# 137412626

Catherine and Henry had four children.
1.  Mabel Gertrude Spetzman who married Dr. Henry James Zarovsky Profant
2.  Edna May Spetzman - unmarried, buried with father.
3.  Dorothy Marie Sptezman who married Robert Anthony Daniels
4.  John Edward Spetzman - unmarried, buried with his mother in California
JOHN EDWARD SPETZMAN

California, Death Index, 1940-1997

Name:John E Spetzman

Social Security #:

Gender:Male

Birth Date:15 Sep 1901

Birth Place:Wisconsin

Death Date:26 Jul 1971

Death Place:Santa Barbara

U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014

Name:Catherine M. Spetzman

SSN:

Last Residence:

93105 Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, USA

BORN:30 Mar 1875

Died:15 Jun 1968

State (Year) SSN issued:California (1966)

1.  MABEL GERTRUDE SPETZMAN
DOROTHY CATHERINE PROFANT

Mabel Gertrude Profant

Birth: Dec. 21, 1894

Death: May 12, 1982

 

Burial:
Santa Barbara Cemetery 
Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara County
California, USA
Plot: Ridge-Lot 636-Quadrant N 1/2-Grave 02

 
Created by: Ron West
Record added: Apr 24, 2012 
Find A Grave Memorial# 89060667

Henry J Profant

Birth: unknown

Death: Apr. 29, 1944

 

Burial:
Santa Barbara Cemetery 
Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara County
California, USA
Plot: Ridge-Lot 636-Quadrant N 1/2-Grave 01

 
Created by: Ron West
Record added: Apr 24, 2012 
Find A Grave Memorial# 89060665

2.  EDNA MAY SPETZMAN

Edna M Spetzman

Birth: Mar. 16, 1896

Death: Sep. 8, 1978

 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Henry J Spetzman (1864 - 1912)

 

Burial:
Saint Alphonsus Catholic Cemetery 
New Munster
Kenosha County
Wisconsin, USA

 
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

 
Created by: douglas kimberlin
Record added: Oct 18, 2014 
Find A Grave Memorial# 137412626

 1920 United States Federal Census

Name:Robert A Dewees

Age:45

Birth Year:abt 1875

Birthplace:Texas

Home in 1920:West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida

Street:Clematis Avenue

House Number:525

Race:White

Gender:Male

Relation to Head of House:Head

Marital Status:Married

Spouse's Name:Cathern Dewees

Father's Birthplace:Illinois

Mother's Birthplace:Texas

Able to Speak English:Yes

Occupation:Keeper

Industry:Hotel

Employment Field:Own Account

Home Owned or Rented:Rent

Able to Read:Yes

Able to Write:Yes

Neighbors:View others on page

Household Members:

NameAge

Robert A Dewees45

Cathern Dewees45

Edna Spetzman22

Dorothy Spetzman20

John E Spetzman19

Margaret May Long Family - East Belmont Farm, Virginia
East Belmont Farm near Keswick, Virginia 1913
ISAAC LONG Jr.  About 1913

1880 United States Federal Census

Name:Isaac Long

Age:48

Birth Year:abt 1832

Birthplace:Virginia

Home in 1880:Rivanna, Albemarle, Virginia

Race:White

Gender:Male

Relation to Head of House:Self (Head)

Marital Status:Married

Spouse's Name:E.H. Long

Father's Birthplace:Virginia

Mother's Birthplace:Virginia

Neighbors:View others on page

Occupation:Farmer

Cannot read/write:

Blind:

Deaf and dumb:

Otherwise disabled:

Idiotic or insane:

View image

Household Members:

NameAge

Isaac Long48

E.H. Long42

W.Larisce Long19

Lula G. Long15

Isaac F. Long14

Bessie M. Long12

Fanny Long10

David G. Long9

Magdalena Long6

James C. Long4

Isaac Long

Birth: Sep. 7, 1832

Death: Jun. 25, 1915

 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Isaac Long (1791 - 1852)
  Elizabeth Shuler Long (1791 - 1847)
 
 Spouse:
  Elizabeth H Mohler Long (1837 - 1906)*
 
 Children:
  Louise Latrobe Long (1868 - 1957)*
  Bessie M Long (1868 - 1957)*
  David Grigsby Long (1871 - 1944)*
  Margaret Long Dewees (1874 - 1902)*
  Thomas Long (1882 - 1882)*
 
 Siblings:
  Barbara Jane Long Spindle (1826 - 1851)*
  Caroline V. Long Price (1831 - 1891)*
  Isaac Long (1832 - 1915)
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Inscription:
Born at Old Fort Long, Page County, Va.; Died at East Belmont, Albemarle County, Va.
 
Note: Shares stone with Elizabeth M., Louise & Bessie Long & Margaret Dewees

 

Burial:
Grace Episcopal Church Cemetery 
Cismont
Albemarle County
Virginia, USA

 
Maintained by: Mary Ann M
Originally Created by: FDP
Record added: Jul 03, 2008 
Find A Grave Memorial# 28006235