G. H. TICHENOR

and


Margaret A. Drane

Descendants

PART II

 

THE ANCESTORS OF GEORGE HUMPHREY TICHENOR

(Tichenor Line)

To

The American Immigrant

Martin Tichenor (Puritan) of Newark, New Jersey

PART I

RETURN 

TO


Dr. G. H. Tichenor

Home Page

PART III

M. A DRANE
ANCESTORS
TO


Anthony Drane
The 
Immigrant

PART IV

G. H. TICHENOR

and


Margaret A. Drane

Descendants

PARENTS:

ROLLA TICHENOR

 

Source:

Tichenor Families in America, Harold A. Tichenor, 1988, page 303

(Excerpted selections)

 


ROLLA TICHENOR:  Rolla was born 1811 in Ohio County Kentucky and died after Oct. 12, 1853, in Columbus, Kentucky. He was the son of Timothy and Elizabeth (Humphrey) Tichenor, Daughter of George and Barbara Humphrey. Elizabeth Humphrey died between 1846 and 1850 in Rumsey, Kentucky. George and Barbara Humphrey lived and were landowners in McLean County, Kentucky. Rolla and Elizabeth Tichenor were living in Ohio County, Kentucky in 1840 and 1850 as revealed by the censuses of those years. In 1846 they sold 190 acres “in that part of said (Ohio) County known as ‘the point’ between Green River and Rough Creek.” The property included “the piece where said Tichenor formerly resided” Their residence, given in the deed was Muilenburg County, Kentucky. Their two sons, “George H. Tichenor and Thomas Tichenor” were named (as grandsons) in the will of Barbara Humphrey in 1873.

 

Rolla Tichenor, married second, Christina Ferguson, widow of Samuel Ferguson. The following Ferguson children were listed in the household of Rolla and Christina Tichenor in the 1850 census: William T., 15 Male; Laura E., 12 Female: Nancy J., 10 Female; Sally a., 8 Female and Samuellen, 4 Female.

 

Rolla and Christina were legally separated on December 30, 1850. Each kept the property they owned before marriage and she got to keep the livestock. Rolla Tichenor was a merchant and steamboat owner. On October 12, 1854, he gave a friend power of attorney to handle his business.

 

Whether his business took him away from the Ohio County, Kentucky, area, or he became incapacitated (He is believed to have died about the same time), is not known. The document available reads in part (with some punctuation added and with blanks to indicate words unreadable in the available copy);

 

“Know all men by these presents that I, Rolly Tichenor, Merchant on Store Boat lying in Green River Kentucky, do hereby constitute and appoint Jacob L. Conditt of Kentucky to be my true, sufficient, and lawful attorney for and in my name and for my _____ to ask, demand, sue for, recover, and receive, all such Service or _____ of money, debts, and other demands what so ever which is or shall be due me, owing, payable, and belonging to me, by any manner or means whatsoever, Especially to receive _____ _____ _____ for any and cause in the counties of McLean, Muhlenberg, Ohio and Butler inclusive and the highering of and receiving the pay for my black woman, Charity, now possession (or hired to) of John T Bennett of Livermore, Kentucky…”

 

Children by First Marriage (Tichenor)

1. Thomas J.

2. George Humphrey

GRANDPARENTS:

 

TIMOTHY TICHENOR

 

Source:

Tichenor Families in America, Harold A. Tichenor, 1988, page 282

(Excerpted selections)

 

Son of Daniel and Catherine (Wade) Tichenor. He was born January 1, 1773, in Morris County New Jersey, and died in 1856 in Ohio County Kentucky. He married Elizabeth Humphrey, daughter of John Humphrey (DAR) and Betty Humphrey on April 20, 1797. John Humphrey owned land on North River in Hardin County Kentucky and had a distillery. He died in Hardin County Kentucky in 1815. Timothy Tichenor’s primary occupation was presumably farming, but he had a sugarbush and ran a grist mill after moving to Ohio County. He also had a still which was licensed on August 25, 1817. He bought 40 acres of land on Plum Run in Nelson County Kentucky, in 1796. He received 600 acres off the south end of his father’s land in Ohio County, by his father’s will, and may have moved there in 1805 or 1806.

The census shows him living there in 1810 and he lived there the rest of his life. He built a house near the center of the farm. He and Elizabeth were charter members of the Walton’s Creek Baptist Church which was organized in 1814. Timothy left the church in 1823 because of a quarrel he had with another member. The manner of his leaving seems worth recording in some detail because of the bearing it has on the practice of the Baptist Church at that time on hearing and adjudicating grievances between members. It is recorded that Timothy brought two charges against Brother Thomas Ashby. In March 1823 the church

“took up the matter of dealing brought by Brother Timothy Tichenor against Brother Ashby for first agreeing to take 25 or 30 aplle barrels and afterward denying the bargin and not taking the whole of the barrels. The charge not substantiated and Brother Ashby was acquitted”

At a meeting the following May, there was doubt as to whether the church had voted on the charges.

“The Church being convinced that a vote had not been taken at the March meeting, therefore, took the same into consideration whereupon an investigation was entered into upon the merits of the case between said brethren.”

The church found the charges and Timothy’s attitude unjustified “whereupon we exclude him from our membership.

” In the second charge “Brother T. Tichenor states that he is dissatisfied with Brother Ashby concerning a twenty-dollar bank bill which one of them received at Darlington which bill is said to be counterfeit and in consequence thereof he wants Brother Ashby to lose five dollars of the said money. The parties being fully heard, the church is of the opinion that Brother Ashby is not bound to pay the said money.”

At a church meeting in April

“Brother T. Tichenor professed to be aggrieved with the decision of the church at the last meeting respecting the $20.00 bill and requested a rehearing of that case which was granted. The church then agreed by the consent of Brethren Tichenor and Ashby to send t Beaver Dam Church for a committee of five brethren to come to our next meeting to settle the difficulty between the two brethren.”

This committee reported at the May meeting :

 

“After hearing the statements from both parties together with some testimony detailed from others we are of the opinion after weighing all the circumstances that Brother Ashby should lose five dollars of the aforementioned bill.”

Timothy Tichenor was active in the affairs of his county and community. An old order book records the following in the June term, 1807:

“ordered that Timothy Tichenor cut the road of which he is now overseer 30 feet wide and keep the same clean and smooth agreeable to law.” The road is not named. In the August term, he was given another job as overseer, for which he was, however, soon “discontinued.” In the latter commission, it was “ordered that Timothy Tichenor be appointed overseer of the road leading from the Morton’s ferry road to opposite Cornwell’s landing on the Green River to cut out the same 15 feet wide from the intersection with said Morton’s ferry road near the Black Bear Pond, to Walton’s Creek and that he has for his hands all those who live on said creek or its waters to assist him.”

Timothy Tichenor was a member of the jury for the trial of William Smeathers for the murder of Andrew Norris on April 11, 1809, in Ohio County Kentucky.

Before he left the Walton’s Creek Baptist Church, his name is found in the church minutes a number of times serving on a committee “to see to the laying off of the church grounds for the meeting house and graveyard”: on a committee of finance, and serving in other capacities. Two hundred acres off the west side of his farm were sold in 1824 to pay debts.

In 1829 he mortgaged most, it would appear, of his personal property, including two stills, to his son Johns to cover a $400 note and two smaller notes. In 1840 he sold 100 acres of his farm to John for $140, perhaps to pay the debt. In the same year, he deeded the remainder of his farm to his daughter and son-in-law, Anna and Jacob H. Inglehart, who lived nearby, for the consideration that they care for them as long as they live. The use of the house and garden was reserved. Also, any “ores” found on the land were reserved to be the property of all of the children of Timothy Tichenor or their heirs. The 1850 census lists him, age 75, living alone.

Children of Timothy Tichenor and Elizabeth Humphrey

 1. Daniel E                                                                                                                                                                                             2. John                                                                                                                                                                                                   3. Sarah                                                                                                                                                                                                 4. Mary                                                                                                                                                                                                   5. Ann (Anna)                                                                                                                                                                                     6. Rolla                                                                                                                                                                                               7. Benjamin Tolbert

GREAT GRANDPARENTS:

DANIEL TICHENOR

Source:

Tichenor Families in America, Harold A. Tichenor, 1988, page 200

(Excerpted selections)

Daniel was born in 1742 in Morris County New Jersey and died April 12, 1804, in Nelson County, Kentucky; buried in the Tichenor family Cemetery in Nelson County, Kentucky. He married Catherine (Elizabeth) Wade. She was born in 1736 and died on January 8, 1776. They were Presbyterians and the births and baptisms of most of their children are recorded in the Morristown Church Register. Several years before the American Revolution, Daniel Tichenor purchased a farm in Morris County where he lived for 15 or 20 years.

He served in the Revolutionary War in the Minute Men and Militia. On March 2, 1776, the Provincial Congress of New Jersey adopted an “Ordinance for incorporating the Minute Men lately raised in this Colony into the body of the Militia.” After the ordinance was adopted, the company of Captain James Wheeler, of which Daniel was a member, petitioned the Congress as follows:

 

“The Petition of Capt. James Wheeler, Officers and Privates of his Company of Minute Men Humbly Sheweth_____ “That your petition in obedience to the Resolution of your honorable House, did at the considerable expense equip themselves as a minute Company being armed and accourted, and also went to the Expense of putting themselves in a uniform of dress, and continued as a minute Company for upwards of four months, and were always ready and willing to do any Duty that was imposed on them, and were still desirous of continuing in that capacity, but being informed that the minute Companies by a resolution of Congress are to be dissolved—do humbly beg that you take into consideration the Service and Expense your petitioners have been at—and establish them as a Company of Grenadiers to the North Battalion in this Township, and allow the Officers to retain the Men that enlist as Minute Men under them and who are still desirous of continuing together—If you should decline this request it would be a means of breaking up a Company who has required Reputation as a well-regulated and disciplined Body—Your petitioners are embold-ened to make the Petition from a sense, that the Integrity and Justice of this House will lead them to deal with honor and equity to every set of Men under their care and Jurisdiction—“

Daniel Tichenor was one of sixty signers of this resolution. The response to the resolution is not known, but he served in Capt. Isaac Halsey’s Company, Morris County, New Jersey, Militia, Eastern Battalion.

Children: 1. Joseph 5. Jane 2. Daniel 6. Phoebe 3. Jacob 7. Elizabeth 4. Timothy 8. Sarah. 

Daniel married second Anna Byram, daughter of Ebenezer and Abigail (Alden) Byram, and the widow of Peter Condit, May 6, 1776. Ebenezer Byram was the son of Capt. Ebenezer and Hannah (Haywood) Byram, and the Grandson of Capt. Nicholas and Mary (Edson) Byram, and Joseph and Alice (Brett) Hayward. Abigail Alden was the daughter of Capt. Ebenezer and Anna (Keith) Alden and the Granddaughter of Isaac and Mehitable (Allen) Alden, and Joseph and Elizabeth (Forbes) Keith. Anna Byram's roots were very deep in Massachusetts where all her Great, great grandparents lived going back to the Plymouth Colony.

An account of the family’s move to Kentucky was given by James Tichenor, Daniel’s son.

 “ In 1790 he (Daniel) exchanged his farm in Morris County, New Jersey with Capt. John Howell for land on the Green River in Ohio County, Kentucky, and in September 1790 removed with his family to Kentucky. He was greatly disappointed respecting his new purchase. The Green River country was a waste wilderness---The habitation only of Indians and beasts of the forest, not a white family within 50 miles. During his life, he dreamed of taking his family there, and thus a valuable home in New Jersey was lost to him and his descendants. Of this track he never took possession in person but bequeathed it to his sons, some of whom afterward removed there. “A day having been designated for their departure, the Reverend Hillyer of the Presbyterian Church in Madison New Jersey, the called Bottle Hill, of which Mr. and Mrs. Tichenor were members, preached a sermon at the house on the occasion, to a very large assembly of friends and neighbors convened to bid farewell and to express their wishes and earnest prayers for a prosperous journey and safe arrival at their place of destination. Much feeling was manifested and many tears were shed at the separation---and a long procession followed the travelers several miles on their journey. “

The whole company traveled in wagons to Pittsburg where they obtained a boat and descended the Ohio River to Limestone, now Maryville, where they landed and proceeded in wagons to Nelson County and built their cabins on Cox’s Creek near Bardstown in the County.

 In September 1975 Mr. Tichenor bought a lot of land about 60 acres on Plum Run in Nelson County where he built a dwelling to which he removed in 1796 and resided there until his death which occurred on the 10th of April, 1804. For many years Mr. Tichenor had been subject to violent attacks of asthma which often seemed to threaten sudden death. During the intervals he enjoyed comfortable health, leading a life of exemplary piety, temperance, and industry.

“He laid out a family burial ground on his farm in Nelson County in which his remains with those of his widow, many of his children, grandchildren, and neighbors have been deposited. “

In November 1804, 7 months after her husband’s death, Mrs. Tichenor visited New Jersey and spent the winter and spring with her brothers and sisters and her three sons by her first marriage. She traveled on horseback, accompanied by her son, Jonas, to Wheeling, at which place by the previous appointment she was met by her oldest son, Edward Condit, and proceeded with him to Morristown, New Jersey. In May 1805 she returned home accompanied by her son Byram Condit, and his family of 5 or 6 children.

Three other families removed at the same time, Vis: Uzel Condit, Daniel Prudden, Abraham Lindley, and Daniel Lindley. They all settled on Green River in Ohio County, Kentucky in a village called Point Pleasant. Jared Tichenor and his brother, Jonas reside also in Ohio County with many others of the connections and descendants….

 Mrs. Tichenor resided on the farm of her husband during the remainder of her life which terminated on the 8th of July 1826 at the age of 76 years. Sometime previously she had a fall by which the neck of the thigh bone was broken rendering her a cripple for the remainder of her life. Two of her sisters had been crippled in the same manner at about that point of life.

Family cemeteries were very common in early Kentucky. Daniel Tichenor’s descendants are buried in a number of them, only three of which bear the Tichenor name: The Daniel Tichenor Cemetery in Nelson County, the Aunt Jane Tichenor Cemetery in Ohio County, and the Benjamin Tolbert Cemetery in McLean County. Jared Tichenor and part of his family were buried on his farm in Ohio County but were later moved to the Centertown Cemetery. Other family cemeteries bear the names of relatives.

The epitaph on the gravestone of Daniel Tichenor reads:

                                                            SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF DANIEL TICHENOR                                                                                         A NATIVE OF NEW JERSEY WHO EMIGRATED TO KENTUCKY IN 1790                                                                                                             DIED APR. 12, 1804 AGED 62 YEARS                                                                                                      AT HOME IN N. JERSEY HE ENJOYED THE CONFIDENCE & ESTEEM                                                    DUE TO HIM AS A CHRISTIAN IN FAITH

                    AND PRACTICE CONTINUING UNTIL HIS DEATH

                                                                 READER WOULD THOU FOLLOW HIM TO GLORY                                                                       THEN COPY HIS RIGHT EXAMPLE

The epitaph on the gravestone of Anna Tichenor reads:

                                           THERE IS REST IN HEAVEN SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF ANNA                                                                                           WIDOW OF PETER CONDIT & OF DANIEL TICHENOR                                                                                                                                BORN IN N. JERSEY 1750                                                                                                                                                               MOVED TO KENTUCKY 1790                                                                                                                                                     DIED JULY 8, 1826 AGED 78 YEARS                                                                                                                                        THO DEAD SHE YET SPEAKETH SAYING

                                        “I HAVE FOUND SALVATION BY THE CROSS READER HAST THOU?”

A Revolutionary Soldier marker was placed on the grave of Daniel Tichenor by the DAR in 1974. Dwight Davis Cornell placed the marker in the masonry at the cemetery

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

Will of Daniel Tichenor


In the name of God amen; I Daniel Tichenor Senr. of the County of Nelson and State of Kentucky being sick and weak of body but of perfect mind and memory do make and ordain this my last will and testament (that is to say) principally and first of all I recommend my soul into the hand of Almighty God that gave it and my body. I recommend to be buried in a decent manner ~ and as touching such worldly estate where with it has pleased God to bless me in this life.

I give devise and dispose of the same in the following manner & form towit, and first I desire that my funeral charges be paid and all my lawfull debts discharged ~ I give and bequeath unto my well beloved wife Anna Tichenor all my estate both real and personal that I possess in the aforesaid County of Nelson and also to collect what debts may be due to me in this state and grant receipts for the same for her use and behold during her widowhood ~  for her use and the schooling and bringing up the children I have by her ~  and I also empower her to sell any of my estate personal or real or all of it if need be: to discharge the following legacies and if my wife Anna sees it fit to marry it is my desire that She be entitled to seventy pounds Current money to be paid in such property as she may choose at the real value to have and to enjoy forever. And also I give and bequeath unto my beloved so Peter Tichenor the sum of five pounds Current money;

I give and bequeath unto my son Jared Tichenor the sum of five pounds like money;  I give and bequeath unto my son Jonas Tichenor the sum of five pounds like money ~ I give and bequeath unto my son Silas Tichenor the sum of five pounds like money ~ I give and bequeath unto my son James the sum of five pounds like money.

Also I give and bequeath unto my daughter Phebe Sutton the sum of thirty pounds in property ~

I give and bequeath unto my daughter Jane Mash the sum of fifteen pounds in property ~

I give and bequeath unto Sarah Langsford my daughter the sum of five pounds ~

 I give and bequeath unto my daughter Anna Tichenor the sum of five pounds ~

It is my desire that my wife Anna Tichenor after paying my debt dues and the above mentioned legacies and taking out the sum of seventy pounds as aforesaid do divide the overplus among the above mentioned children at her own discretion ~

I give and bequeath unto my sons Joseph, Daniel, Jacob and Timothy Tichenor the quantity of two thousand four hundred acres of land being in a tract of two thousand and five hundred acres that I purchased from John Howell lying on the waters of Green River and bounding on Rough Creek in Ohio County to be equally divided among them in quantity and quality with their paying a legacy to my daughter Elizabeth of thirteen pounds each and the interest to be ~ paid her annually after my decease and the principal to be paid at the discretion of my Executors as they see she has need ~

I give and bequeath unto my son James  the remaining hundred acres of the two thousand five hundred acres as above mentioned lying on the Green River ~

Beginning at the lower corner on Rough Creek and extending through the bottom to the hill laid off in a long square; I also give to the said James, one hundred & fifty acres adjoining the aforesaid tract which I purchased from the aforesaid John Howell and after the above mentioned land is divided to ~ every one as aforesaid it is my desire that should any older claim interfere with any part of it that they shall all bear an equal  proportion of the loss. And lastly should anything be recovered from Debts

 

due me inthe Jerseys the vouchers for which is in the hands of Lewis Condict who has a power of attorney from me to act for me, it is my desire that what is recovered may be equally divided among my Children ~

I also constitute and appoint executor of this my last will and testament My trusty friend Anna Tichenor my wife ~ also Jacob Tichenor and Peter Tichenor my sons to be the sole executors of this my last will and testament ~

and I do hereby utterly revoke and disannul all & every other former Testaments, Wills, Legacies, Bequeasts, and Executors, by me in any wise mentioned Willed and Bequeathed, ratifying and confirming This and no other to be my last will and testament. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty-second day of April one thousand eight hundred & three. 

                                   
Signed Sealed & delivered   Daniel Tichenor   seal

In the presence of
John Bruner
Jacob Fulkerson
Phip. Fulkerson
                his
  Thomas    X  Bolden
              mark

 

At a County Court held for Nelson County on Monday the 14th day of May 1804 This last will and testament of Daniel Tichenor decd was proved by the oaths of John Bruner and Jacob Fulkerson two of the subscribing witnesses thereto and sworn to by Anna Tichenor the Executrix and Jacob Tichenor and Peter Tichenor the Executors therein named & was ordered to be recorded.

Teste
Ben Grayson
C.C.

Children:

 1.  Joseph                                                                                                                                                                                                   2.  Daniel                                                                                                                                                                                                 3.  Jacob                                                                                                                                                                                                    4.  Timothy                                                                                                                                                                                     5.  Jane                                                                                                                                                                                                   6.  Phoebe                                                                                                                                                                                                 7.  Elizabeth                                                                                                                                                                                                  8.  Sarah

2X GREAT, GRANDPARENTS:

 

JOSEPH TICHENOR

 

Source:

Tichenor Families in America, Harold A. Tichenor, 1988, page 106

(Excerpted selections)

 

Joseph was born probably between 1680 and 1690 in Newark, NJ.  He married Elizabeth (Possibly Burgess) and died at (Vernon, Morris, NJ) in 1750.  After his death, Elizabeth married Samuel Wade before Nov. 6, 1751.  Joseph Tichenor left Newark and moved to Morris Co., NJ. In 1725 – 1730.  In 1730 he acquired land in New Vernon – a few miles south of Morristown – from two attorneys who were agents for John Alford in selling a large section of land which he had received from the Council of Proprietors of West Jersey in 1715.  These men were citizens of Essex County in which Newark is located, and it is probable that arrangements for the purchase of this land were made in Newark by Joseph and several other pioneer families.  A second tract of land was purchased in 1739.  He also acquired land in what is known as “Turkey Pasture” from the heirs of William Penn.  Turkey Pasture is in the Great Swamp, now a wildlife preserve. 

 

In the records of the First Presbyterian Church of Morristown, we find the words, “confest for disregarding the lot” by Joseph’s name.  This referred to a casting of lots to settle a dispute over establishing a church in Morristown.  The people of Morristown, or West Hanover, as it was named then, worshipped at the Presbyterian Church at Hanover which was established by 1718.  By 1733 the population of Morristown (not officially named that until 1740) had greatly increased, and the desire became general to have a church of their own.  When the eastern portion of the parish opposed the move, the church resorted o the casting of lots, which resulted against the proposed division.  The lot, notwithstanding, a Morristown church was organized and a confession for disregarding the lot was required of those who had a part in it, Joseph among them.  The church records also show that he renewed his covenant April 24, 1743, and became a communicant in Sept. 1749.

 

Joseph and Elizabeth Tichenor had seven children.  The first five named below were named in his will written Mar. 1, 1750.  These children were minors and Joseph did not appoint a guardian.  On Nov. 5, 1751, Joseph, James and Jane being over the age of 14 asked the court to appoint Thomas Woodruff, Jr. of Elizabeth, NJ., their guardian, which the courts ordered.  Daniel and Moses were also minors, but under the age of 14 and not entitled by law to choose their guardian.   

 

Children:

1.  Moses

2.  James

3. Joseph

4. Daniel

5.  Jane

6.  Isaac

7.  David

3X GREAT GRANDPARENTS:

 

DANIEL TICHENOR

 

Source:

Collections of the New Jersey Historical Society, Vol VI, 'Records of the town of Newark., Daniel listed in index of names 1667, 1680, 1684, 1689 et al.

 

OCCUPATION: Yeoman. On 1 Jun 1680, Dan'l was deeded 2 acres in his father's home lot. On 2 May 1694, he bought 4 1/2 acres adjacent to that property. He had a son, Daniel, Jr. and another son, Joseph. Joseph moved to Morris Co., NJ 1725-30. His son was Daniel Tichenor; he m. (2) Anna (Byram) Condict, who was a Third great grand daughter of John and Priscilla (Mullens) Alden.

 

 

.....................................................................................................................................................................

 

Source:

Tichenor Families in America, Harold A. Tichenor, 1988, pages 40 – 41

(Excerpted selections)

 

DANIEL TICHENOR

 

Was born Aug 9, 1656 in New Haven Colony and died 1728.  He married Elizabeth Baldwin, daughter of John Jr. and Hannah (Bruen) Baldwin 1690 in Newark, NJ.  The Fundamental Agreement of the first settlers of Newark was signed by a Daniel Tichenor.  It is generally considered improbable that the signer was (our) Daniel as he was only eleven years old at the time.  However, no Daniel Tichenor got land in the first division of land or was on the first tax list as would be expected of a man of age.  The name, Daniel Tichenor, does not appear in records of the town meetings in Newark, after the signing of the Fundamental Agreement, until 1680.  Here the record shows Daniel requesting land.  This was surely (our) Daniel as he was 23 at the time.  The records therefore give no evidence of an older Daniel Tichenor.

 

What the rules concerning the age of voters were in the colony is not known, but there seems no good reason that a minor child could not have signed the Fundamental agreement.  Although temporarily in effect, it did not have the force of law, and in fact its principal provision that only members of the established church would be “admitted freemen or free Burgesses” was ignored by the governor in 1674 when he announced that letters of admission to towns in the province would be through the Governor and Council.

 

Daniel Tichenor's name appears 6 times between 1680 and 1700 in the town records. In 1684 he had "Liberty... to take up a piece of land in the Common" He was chosen fence viewer in 1689, and was chosen pounder in 1690. One item in the town record March 5, 1693 as follows: Whereas, there is much Prophanation of the Lord's Day in the time of Worship, by the playing of Boys and Girls; therefore, Daniel Tichenor and Thomas Lyon are chosen to look after them, and to correct them, or call them by Name as they shall see occasion, for the year ensuing.

 

June 1, 1680, Daniel Tichenor was deeded 2 acres in his father's home lot. Daniel bought 4 1/2 acres in "Little or Tichenor's Neck" adjacent to that lot, May 2, 1694. In 1697 he received land, evidently jointly with his brother, Jonathan, in right of their father. Sept. 3, 1701, he had an "interest of one right" in purchase agreement covering Indian lands west of Newark.  His will, written Nov. 4, 1727, named his wife, Elizabeth, and children.

 

1.  Daniel

2.  John

3.  Joseph

4.  Jane (She probably married David Brown, who died 1724, and had a son, Thomas, for whom his uncle, Daniel Tichenor was made guardian, May 10, 1737.  Jane married 2nd _____ Tuttle (no further data)

 

 

………………………………………………………………….....................................…………………………………………………..

 

WILL of DANIEL TICHENOR (1727)

DANIEL TICHENOR

In the name of God Amen the 4th Day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred twenty seven I Daniel Tichenor of Newark in County of Essex and providence of New Jersey yeomen being very sick and weak in body but in perfect memory thanks be given unto God therefore calling unto mind the mortality of body and knowing it is appointed for all men to once die do make and ordain this my last will and testament that is to say principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul into the hands of God and my body I recommend to the earth to be buried in decent Christian burial at the discretion of my executors and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me in this life.

 

I give demise and dispose of same in following manner to form imprimis.

 

I give and bequeath to Elizabeth, my dearly beloved wife, the one equal third of profits of all my land and meadow during her natural life and I do also give unto her said wife all movable estate to dispose as she shall think fit except ten shillings which I do give and bequeath to my well beloved daughter Jane Tuttle to be raised and levied out of my movable estate.

 

Item: I give and bequeath my well beloved son, John Tichenor all that tract of land where he now dwells and all the land lying at Logg Hill that is now within fence and all that tract of meadow lying at Tompkins point and the one equal half part of that tract of Salt Meadow lying by Camfields Creek by him and his heirs, and assigns freely to be possessed and enjoyed forever.

 

Item: I give and bequeath my well beloved son Joseph Tichenor all that tract of meadow lying at mouth of river and also one equal half part of all that tract of meadow lying by Maple Island which I bought of John Ward on that side next to the Island and also twenty pounds current money of this province to be raised and levied out of estate which I give to my two sons John and Daniel Tichenor and ten pounds thereof to be paid to him by my son John Tichenor and ten pounds thereof to be paid to him by son Daniel Tichenor and by him his heirs and assigns freely to be possessed and enjoyed forever

 

.Item: I give and bequeath to my well beloved Daniel Tichenor all my homestead of land both that whereon my dwelling house standeth and also that tract of land lying by house lot of land of Dr. Schutt with all the appurtenance there unto belonging and also the upland lying in Little Neck together with all swamp and boggy meadow adjoining to it together with all that tract lying (small hole in will) the two mile brook (small hole) all the land lying at Logg Hill that is not within fence and also the one equal half part of all that tract of meadow lying by Camfield Creek and also all that part of meadow by the Egund Creek and also the equal half part of all that tract of meadow which I bought of John Ward by him his heirs and assigns freely to be possessed and enjoyed forever.

 

And my will is that Elizabeth my dearly beloved wife be my executrix and John Baldwin of Newark aforesaid be my executor of my last will and testament and I do hereby utterly disallow revoke and disanull all and every other former testaments, wills and legacies and bequeaths and executors by me in any ways before named willed and bequeathed ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament

 

.In witness whereof I have set hereunto my hand and seal the day and year above written.

 

His Daniel X Tichenor mark

Witness: John Baldwin

Phoebe Day

Mary Day

 

The TICHENOR Wills is maintained by jbrandt@ucla.edu, using GenBBS 1.14

 

Children:

1.  Daniel

2.  John

3. Joseph

4.  Jane (She probably married David Brown, who died 1724, and had a son, Thomas, for whom his uncle, Daniel Tichenor was made guardian, May 10, 1737.  Jane married 2nd _____ Tuttle (no further data)

4X GREATGRANDPARENTS:

 

MARTIN TICHENOR

 

Source:

http://www.titchenal.com/index.html

 

The first known record of Martin Tichenor is when he took an oath of allegiance at New Haven Colony in August 1644. He was married by the governor of New Haven to Mary Charles, daughter of John Charles, May 16, 1651. Their 8 children, Nathaniel,

 

 

Sarah, John, Abigail, Daniel, Hannah, Samuel and Jonathan were the native born Americans that fostered thousands of Tichenors in America.

 

Their descendants can be found in every state of the Union with last name variations of Tichenor, such as Teachenor, Tichinel, Tichnell, Tishner, Titchenal, Titchenell, Titchnell and possibly others unknown to us. In 1665 New Haven and Connecticut were merged into one colony.

 

Martin and a group of 30 other Puritan families, under the leadership of John Treat, found the religious environment in Connecticut intolerable and left New Haven in 1666 to found Newark N.J. This was the first of many history making events in which Tichenors participated. A rough count of all thirteen generations since Martin total over 20,000 different names and about 5,100 current descendants using one of the many spelling variations of the name Tichenor.

 

Based on telephone connections in America today, the Tichenor families are spread all over America. 78 of the families live in the NORTHEAST, 24 still live in NEW JERSEY, 17 in PENNSYLVANIA, 111 in the SOUTHEAST, 339 in the GREAT LAKES region, 139 in the Central area and 152 in the PACIFIC COAST area. Imagine all these descendants are just from Martin and Mary Tichenor, who were married in 1651.Martin's will names son-in-law Ensign John TREAT and the TREAT genealogical data says John's wife was Sarah TICHENOR.

 

"In 1665 New Haven and CT were merged into one colony. The new constitution allowed baptism of children irrespective of parents' church membership This was displeasing to the strict members of New Haven; the Puritan practices permitting this ordinance only for children of 'the elect.' HAT p. 3. Martin took the oath of allegiance to the New Haven Colony in Aug 1644; he m. 16 May 1651, Mary Charles, daughter. of John Charles. So Martin born, probably. ca. 1620/30 Ref#168: pg. xxxiv.

 

The Will of Martin Tichanor, of Newark, was dated October 19, 1681, was proved by the oath of two witnesses, Ephraim Burwell and William Camp, who made oath before James Bollen, Justice, that "they were present as witnesses to the signing and seal ing of this last will and testament of Martin Tichanor, deceased." Bollen was also a Secretary of the Province of East Jersey, and so in close touch with the Governor, by whom he was doubtless authorized to take the proof of this will. Letters of administration were issued to John Tichanor, executor under the last will and testament of Martin Tichanor, his father, by Governor Phillip Carteret, November 14, 1681. pg. 463 N.J. Archives, XXI. p. 45 and Essex Wills.

 

 Martin Tichenor came, tradition says from France. This statement first appeared in print, to the writer's knowledge, in Collections of the New Jersey Historical Society, Volume VI, Supplement, in 1866. The source was possibly that Tichenor families living in New Jersey at the time, as local families had some input in this volume. The tradition of French origin has since been handed down in print a number of times, most notably in Richard Bennington Teachenor's a Partial History of the Tichenor Family in America, Descendants of Martin Tichenor, the most widely distributed Tichenor history at the time (1918).

 

A close study of the Connecticut and New Jersey Colonial Records convinces the writer that Martin was a Puritan, and most probably came from England. Atwater's History of New Haven, chapters II, III and IV, reference several times is made to the fact that members of the colony settling at Milford and New Haven like those of Massachusetts Bay, came from Kent and Canterbury.

 

New Haven Town Records

May 1652

Thomas Johnson, one of the viewers for fences, complained of 18 rod of Martin Tichennors fence to be naught, so as it will not keepe hoggs out of ye quartr nor some of it great cattell. Martin said he received it of William Seaward for good, and, beside, some of it belongs to M'' Gilbert. Thomas Johnson said that William Seaward told him, it was all Martin Tichennors. The Court told Martin that they must take the viewers word that the fence is not sufficient; therefore he must paye as a fine to the Towne for 18 rod of fence wich is naught 18 wich yet is not so much as is exactly to the Order ; and he must looke that the fence bee forthwith mended, else further fines will be laide, and damage required if hurt be done thereby : and if any of the fence belongs to any other man, he may helpe himselfe as well as he can.

August-September 1652

Martin Tichennor informed ye Court that the fenc which he was fined 18"" for, was not all his; hee was told that the viewer said it was and they must beleeve him, till he can better cleere it. The Court attached in Martin Tichennors hand 9^ 5"^ for a debt Willm Seaward owes to the Towne, and Ordered him not to paye William Seaward any rent till the Towne be satisfyed.

 

.........................

 

Source:

Tichenor Families in America, Harold A. Tichenor, 1988, pages 3 – 5

(Excerpted selections)

 

MARTIN TICHENOR

 

Martin Tichenor took the oath of alliance at New Haven Colony August 1644.  This is the first known record of him.  He was married by the governor to Mary Charles, daughter of John Charles, May 16, 1651.  New Haven records give us the names of two children in addition to those named in his will.  They are Nathaniel, who was born Feb. 25, 1652 and died Feb 27, 1652 and Sarah born 1663.

 

The spelling of Martin Tichenor’s name varied in New Haven records as is seen below, but his will was signed “Tichenor” and, in general, that is the spelling in the Newark records with on notable exception during Newark’s brief rule by the Dutch.  His name on a list of the inhabitants of Newark, who took the oath of Allegiance to the States General of Holland in 1663, was Tichenell. Although the names in a few records pertaining to his sons, end with one or more “l” the Tichenor spelling prevailed.  A great-grandson, Moses, revived the spelling ending with “l” and signed the name Tichenal after leaving New Jersey.

 

Children named in his will dated Oct. 19, 1681

1.  John,  2.  Abigail,  3.  Daniel,  4.  Hannah,  5.  Samuel,  6.  Jonathan

 

John Charles was in Charleston, MA., in 1636 and moved to New Haven before 1640, possibly in 1638.  His lot in New Haven was adjacent to the lot of John Moss, his brother-in-law.  He moved to Branford where he joined in the compact of settlement in 1667 and died in 1673.  The New Haven Colony records contain several pages of court proceedings concerning a John Charles, a mariner.  Presumably, he was the father of Mary Tichenor. 

 

Martin and Mary Tichenor were members of the New Haven Church.  In Parish and township meetings yje men and women sat in separate divisions and the seating is recorded for the year 1655 as follows “in ye seats on ye stile on both sides the dore:

 

Martin Tichenor… In ye side seats all along Goodw Tichenor.”  On Feb. 10, 1661their seating were “below the doore” for Martine Titchnell” and “Sister Titchnell.”

 

Martin Tichenor had a five acre lot in New Haven which he sold in 1666 having joined the party that founded Newark, NJ.  The sale was recorded as follows:

 

     October 2nd 1666

     Martin Tichenor doth alienate forever to Henry Glover one house and land and

     medow formerly belonging to John Charles, as by a deed of sale from ye sd unto

     ye sd Tichinor doth more fully appeare.

 

The location of the lot was recorded when it changed hands the following year.

 

    Henry Glover doth alienate to George Ross, one house & barne & Homelot with

    five acres of land, be it more or less, lieing at the lower end of the subburbs

    quarter, next Milford highway, as by writeing bearing date 5th 1st 1666/7… This 

    formerly was in possession of Martin Tichenor.

 

In 1665 New Haven and Connecticut were merged into one colony.  The new constitution allowed baptism of children irrespective of parents’ church membership.  This was displeasing to the strict church members of New Haven; the Puritan practice permitting this ordinance only for children of “the elect.”  Robert Treat was chairman of a committee acting for them in their desire to migrate from this religious environment which was intolerable for them, When Governor Carteret of New Jersey sent agents to New England, seeking homesteaders for colonization, and carrying the constitution of the government, entitled “The Concessions pf the Lord Proprietors of New Jersey,” which granted the essentials, religious and otherwise, sought by the Puritans, Treat accepted.  A yearly quit-rent of a halfpenny per acre, to be paid the Lord Proprietors, was agreed upon.  After a visit in te late winter of 1665 to the site that would become Newark, Treat returned with a glowing report of the country’s possibilities.  A group of about thirty families from Milford made immediate plans for the exodus.  They traveled by sea and in early May 1666 arrived at the Passaic River.  AS they unloaded their goods, they were met by a tribe of Hackensack Indians who claimed the land.  The Puritans learned that the Governor had not attended to the treaty price with the Indians, as he had guaranteed.  Reluctantly it was decided to return to Milford.  As they prepared to reload their goods, but implored the people to remain.  They consented to stay; dealt with the Indians, purchasing the land for “fifty double-hands of powder, one hundred barrs of lead, twenty Axes, twenty Coats, ten Guns, twenty pistols, ten Kettles, ten Swoards, four blanks, four barrels of beere, ten paire of breeches, fifty knives, twenty howes, eight hundred and fifty fathem of wampem, two Ankors of licquers or something equivolent, and three Troopers Coats.”  The Indians agreed that the bill of sale be held up until the companies from Branford and Guilford arrived in the spring of 1867.

 

The Proprietors of New Jersey held the land under a grant from the Duke of York, brother of King Charles II.  The Duke of York in turn, held it under a grant from the King who claimed the land by right of discovery.  Newark lived under the proprietary government until April 15, 1702 when the “Jerseys” were put under English government authority. 

 

Under the constitution (The Concessions of the Lord Proprietors of New Jersey) the inhabitants of Newark made many of their own laws.  The first articles of govern-ment, known as the Fundamental Agreement, were made October 30, 1666.

 

Unanimously adopted at the first town meeting on May 21, 1666 by the Milford company and delegates representing Branford and Guilford, the document was then forwarded to the two latter places for the signatures of their residents.  The document was then returned to Newark where in June, 1667, the original settlers

 

from Milford signed it.  Credit is therefore given the men of Branford and Guilford.  Of these there were 23 signers.  Martin and his son, Daniel Tichenor were among the 41 “present inhabitants” who signed it in 1667.

 

An item in the agreement was the valuation of estates for tax purposes….  The manner of paying the tax was indicated at a town meeting…. The way of “rating “ and collecting taxes provided the basis for some lively town meetings.  Martin Tichenor’s estate was valued at 169 pounds.  Fifty of this was for himself and 50 was for the five children, leaving 69 pounds as the valuation of his property.   

 

….This was the world of Martin Tichenor and his family.  New Jersey continued to be the home of most, possibly all, of their descendants until after the Revolution.  During the Revolution, tax lists (1778 – 1780) of New Jersey name twenty-eight Tichenors.

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………...................................………………………….

 

 

NEWARK nj.jpg

The map shows the location of lots of the original settlers. Martin's lot was # 35.

 

Tichenor was in the group of Milford settlers who removed to Newark in 1666. He and his son Daniel signed the Fundamental Agreements on 24 June 1667. Martin received home lot #20 between William Camp, Ephraim Pennington and Seth Tomkins. The location of this lot is marked by the present intersection of Tichenor Street and Broad Street in Newark, New Jersey. The southwest corner of the land lay at the extreme end of the town, along the road leading to the salt meadow, known as "Tichenor's Gate", and evidently a position of some vulnerability in the early days. We read that Martin received among several other grants of land a special one of one and a half acres "for his Staying so much on his place when the Town was first Settled", that is, "the first Summer."

He and his sons were active in the community. He was chosen a Heyward, and in 1673 was the Warner of Town Meetings. His eldest daughter, Hannah, married Ensign John Treat, son of Governor Robert Treat.

WILL of MARTIN TICHENOR

 

Posted by DeAnna Fisher on Thu, 19 Aug 1999

Surname: TICHENORWILL of MARTIN TICHENOR

 

The last will and testament of Martin Tichenor being in my right mind and having my understanding and senses my last will and testament is as follows.

 

First I commend my soul to God who gave it and my body to the earth from whence it was taken there to rest until the resurrection of that last day and I do give and dispose of my estate and goods according to the contents herein mentioned.

 

First I do give to my eldest son John Tichenor thirty pounds out of my estate in land and moveables. The remainder of ye lands to be equally divided to my three other sons---one equal third part to my son Daniel Tichenor, one equal third part to my son Samuel Tichenor and the other one third part to my son Jonathan Tichenor and to my daughter Abigail twenty pounds to be paid out of the moveable estate and remainder of my moveable estate to be equally divided to all my children.

 

To my son John one equal fifth part and to my daughter Abigail and to my son Daniel one equal fifth part and to my son Samuel one equal fifth part and to my son Jonathan one equal fifth part, also I do dispose of my son Jonathan to my son-in-law John Treat to dwell with him until he is of full age according to law. Also my will is that my son Jonathan Tichenor shall be executor for my estate, also I do request my neighbor William Camp and Joseph Riggs to be overseer, to see to the true and faithful accomplishments to this my last will and testament and for confirmation of my last will and testament. I have set to my hands and seal this 19th day of October 1681.

Amen.

Martin Tichenor

 

Corner of Tichenor and Broad Streets in Newark New Jersey taken in 2010. The

tan and brown buildings stand where Martin's lot probably was.

Tichenor was in the group of Milford settlers who removed to Newark in 1666. He and his son Daniel signed the Fundamental Agreements on 24 June 1667. Martin received home lot #20 between William Camp, Ephraim Pennington and Seth Tomkins. The location of this lot is marked by the present intersection of Tichenor Street and Broad Street in Newark, New Jersey. The southwest corner of the land lay at the extreme end of the town, along the road leading to the salt meadow, known as "Tichenor's Gate", and evidently a position of some vulnerability in the early days. We read that Martin received among several other grants of land a special one of one and a half acres "for his Staying so much on his place when the Town was first Settled", that is, "the first Summer."

 

He and his sons were active in the community. He was chosen a Heyward, and in 1673 was the Warner of Town Meetings. His eldest daughter, Hannah, married Ensign John Treat, son of Governor Robert Treat.

 

New Haven Town Records

May 1652

Thomas Johnson, one of the viewers for fences, complained of 18 rod of Martin Tichennors fence to be naught, so as it will not keepe hoggs out of ye quartr nor some of it great cattell. Martin said he received it of William Seaward for good, and, beside, some of it belongs to M'' Gilbert. Thomas Johnson said that William Seaward told him, it was all Martin Tichennors. The Court told Martin that they must take the viewers word that the fence is not sufficient; therefore he must paye as a fine to the Towne for 18 rod of fence wich is naught 18 wich yet is not so much as is exactly to the Order ; and he must looke that the fence bee forthwith mended, else further fines will be laide, and damage required if hurt be done thereby : and if any of the fence belongs to any other man, he may helpe himselfe as well as he can.

August-September 1652.

Martin Tichennor informed ye Court that the fenc which he was fined 18"" for, was not all his; hee was told that the viewer said it was and they must beleeve him, till he can better cleere it. The Court attached in Martin Tichennors hand 9^ 5"^ for a debt Willm Seaward owes to the Towne, and Ordered him not to paye William Seaward any rent till the Towne be satisfyed.

 

Children:

 

1.  John                                                                                                                                                                                                  2.  Abigail                                                                                                                                                                                                  3. Daniel                                                                                                                                                                                              4.  Hannah                                                                                                                                                                                            5.  Samuel                                                                                                                                                                                              6.  Jonathan

newark 2.jfif