2022

NATIONAL REUNION
Cartersville, Georgia  
July 19-23 
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Georgis bound, headed to the national reunion
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Florida Division Dinner in Cartersville
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Meetings
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Awesome Statge Set-up
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The SCV's newly elected CiC Jason Boshers
Congratulations Jason Boshers our newly installed CiC
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FLORIDA DIVISION
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FLORIDA DIVISION
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Lt CiC Boshers and CiC McLunney lead in singing "Dixie
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Saturday Night Grand Ball
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Commander In Chief Reception
The Grand Ball
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Florida Debutants
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More Grand Ball Photos
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MISCELLENEOUS
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CHICKAMAUGA TOUR
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ROSE LAWN Tour
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Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973, this beautifully restored Victorian mansion, now owned by Bartow County and operated as a house museum, was once the home of nationally renowned evangelist Samuel Porter Jones, for whom Nashville's Union Gospel Tabernacle (Ryman Auditorium) was built. In 1978, following a drive by local citizens to save Rose Lawn, the home was purchased by Bartow County and developed into a museum to house the writings and memorabilia of Sam Jones and Rebecca Latimer Felton, another Bartow Countian distinguished for her role in history as the first woman to serve in the U.S. Senate.

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CYCLORAMA - ATLANTA HISTORY MUSEUM  Tour
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On February 22, 2019, Atlanta History Center opened Cyclorama: The Big Picture, featuring the fully restored cyclorama painting, The Battle of Atlanta.

At the centerpiece of this new multi-media experience is a 132-year-old hand-painted work of art that stands 49 feet tall, is longer than a football field, and weighs 10,000 pounds. This painting is one of only two cycloramas in the United States—the other being the Battle of Gettysburg cyclorama —making Atlanta home to one of America’s largest historic treasures.

In the 1880s, The Battle of Atlanta cyclorama painting was an immersive experience—the equivalent of virtual reality today. The painting is a full-color, three-dimensional illusion designed to transport the viewer onto the battlefield. Cycloramas were created as a form of entertainment—they were the IMAX of their time. The painting was a visual story about the 1864 Battle of Atlanta, but over time it has evolved into a significant artifact that has its own fascinating story. Now, the historical journey of the painting itself is part of the ‘big picture’.

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A fallen diorama manne-quin repainted 80 years ago to resembled Clark Gable, after the Gone With the Wind actor quipped during a visit that the only thing wrong with the cy-clorama is that he wasn’t in it, according to legend.

The TEXAS
Atlanta History Museum, site of the CYCLORAMA
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The Great Locomotive Chase (also known as Andrews' Raid or the Mitchel Raid) was a military raid that occurred April 12, 1862, in northern Georgia dur  the American Civil War. Volunteers from the Union Army, led by civilian scout James J. Andrewscomman-deered a train, The General, and took it northward toward Chattanooga, Tenn- essee, doing as much damage as poss-ible to the vital Western and Atlantic Railroad (W&A) line from Atlanta to Chattanooga as they went. They were pursued by Confederate forces at first on foot, and later on a succession of  locomotives, including The Texas, for 87 miles (140 km).

Because the Union men had cut the telegraph wires, the Confederates could not send warnings ahead to forces along the railway. Confederates even- tually captured the raiders and quickly executed some as spies, including An- drews; some others were able to flee. Some of the raiders were the first to be awarded the Medal of Honor by the US Congress for their actions. As a civilian, Andrews was not eligible.

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