During the stay in New York, Jess Wright had another occasion to draw his pistols. Someone stole his hunting dogs from the hotel; so, he strapped on his pistols and stalked the thieves through the streets of New York. His method was simple. He whistled for the dogs as he walked up and down the side-walks. Finally, he whistled in front of a salon an heard the dogs answer. He pulled out both pistols and charged through the doors with both pistols pointed and demanded the return of his dogs. They were returned with little difficulty.
 
The passengers finally sailed for Brazil.  After a long, tedious journey, Jesse Wright and his family, as well as his infamous hounds,  found a home on the Rio Guamhanha in a jungle environment with wild animals and other undesirable company, along with some of the other Texans.   This was part of the original McMullen land grant.  Parson E. H. Quillin lived there, as did the Fielder brothers, the Greens, and the Beasleys.  Bachelor William Hargrove built a house on the river bank.
After the falling apart of the McMullen colony (originally named "New Texas", later known as "Eldo-rado") , Jeff Wright, with the hounds, found himself moving to near the community of Americana to the town of Retiro about four miles from Santa Barbara.  Jesse's daughter, Ada Elizabeth Wright and two brothers were born there and the family flourished. Jesse raised rice and beans, made shoes and saddles and everyone was happy until Jesse's pistols got him into trouble again. He was a neighbor of one of the most successful and prosperous Confederados in that area, Mr. Harvey Hall. 
 
Mr. Hall was a wealthy plantation owner from Columbus, Georgia who in 1866 sold all his possessions and land for 10 cents to the dollar and moved to Brazil to start over.  Through hard work and perse-verance, he succeeded in creating a duplicate plantation and plantation home on the Capivari River, near Americana.  Crowning the estate was a spacious, typical Old South mansion, a restful respite for guests and travelers.  Mr. Hall became very successful, bringing in other fellow Georgians by news-paper advertisements, such as blacksmiths, house builders, furniture and wagon makers to join the colony there. 

 

One day in October, 1877, eleven years after he had come down to this strange land, he was shot dead by Jess Wright, the Texas Cowboy, in a field near his home.  There were no witnesses, but it was sur-mised that the shooting had followed an argument between the two men.  An apparent feud between the two men came to a climax over Hall's shooting one of the cowboy's mule who had wandered into Hall's  plantation  and was  trampling  the  cotton fields.  In a rage

Wright approached Hall and demanded satisfaction.  Within min-

utes Hall lay dead.

 

After saying a quick goodbye to his wife and family. Wright fled the colony.  Before nightfall a posse of Confederados an Brazilian State Guard came looking for him, but Wright had caught a ride on a pas-sing train  and was in the port city of Santos, one hundred miles away, by the next morning.  From there he caught a ship for New Orleans, safely out of reach.  However, he did not make it to New Or-leans, but was ensconced on the island Roserize for two years.  We do not know if he took his hounds with him. 

 

Both families were prominent.  The Wrights had their friends and the Halls had theirs, and the ugly incident marred relationships within the colony for years to come.  Things were especially bad for those who helped Mrs. Wright and the children go to Texas to join her fugitive husband, now employed as a lawman.  The belief was that Jess had learned to use his six-shooter too well during the Civil War. Charlie Hall, son of the deceased, planned to go to Texas and hunt down Mr. Wright and settle the score.  Cooler heads prevailed and he was dissuaded by his younger brother and the matter was even-tually dropped.

 With her husband on the run, Jane Wright finally sold out and returned to Texas. She lived a total of 13 years at the Colony. Jesse eventually returned from South America. He bought a tract of land about 4 miles north of Alba, Texas and lived on it until his dealth 15 years later. The property has since been flooded by the building of Lake Fort Reservoir.

Ada Elizabeth (Wright) Sanders' Story.  (Jesse's Daughter)

April 12, 1955
 
     I will try and write a sketch of my life and of my father and mother, J. R. Wright and Susan Jane Garner Wright.  My father was so broken up after the Civil War,with the North whipping the South, that he sold out everything and went to South America.  Before he sold out he lived at Quitman, Texas.  He owned and operated a dry goods store.  

   
 
  

     

   

 

and tied them with Seapor vines, a Brazilian name.  This was their house; it was called a shack.  (Just a room.)  My mother disliked to live in this place.  She could hear all kinds of wild animals, fowls, and poisonous snakes.  She was frightened all the time and she could not visit the other women as it was dangerous to go through the narrow trails that the men had cut through the wilderness.

 The men had to go 100 miles down the river to get provisions.  They had to go in canoes.  It would take a week for them to make the trip.  They would start on Monday morning and wouldn't get back until Saturday night.  The men would go and leave the women and children.  My mother would be so scared she would stand the pole door up before the opening and tie it up.  Just she and the three little boys, the oldest eight years old.  My mother was also afraid of storms and sometimes a bad cloud would come up in the night.  She would be so afraid she would wake the oldest boy and he would console her and help her to feel better.  On Saturday evening she would take her three children and sit on the river bank waiting and listening for the men to return.  They could hear the paddles a mile away.  They lived in this wilderness four years.  My father put out a large orange orchard.

    They moved a long way from this place to Retiro, about four miles from Santa Barbara, Brazil.  Their house was a three room one covered with grass and dirt.  It had a dirt floor.  This is the place where I was born.  I had two brothers born at this place too.  My father raised beans and rice.  He made shoes and saddles.  I remember going through one cotton patch.  I was six years old at this time.  We lived one half mile from an old couple everyone called Uncle Johnnie and Aunt Margret Perkins.  They had an orange orchard that came up close to our house.  They also had sweet lemons, sour lemons, coffee trees and bananas growing there.

     I had an aunt, my mother's sister, and my grandfather. They lived about eight miles from us.  I loved my aunt very dearly.  She would come visit us and I would go home with her.  I rode behind her on horseback.  I was about five years old.  My aunt lived close to a river. The water was so clear I could see the fish swimming in the water.  Close to my aunt's house on the river was a place where they would take the rice and have it hulled.  They had what was called a mangonel; it had a big marter.  They put the rice in and beat it with what was called a postle.  I would go there and look in and see them work-ing.  My mother lived at this place thirteen years. 

  My father got into trouble and left with one of his sons.  They stayed on the Island of Roserize  **  for two years.

     After two years my mother sold everything and came back to America with another family.  When we were leaving there we spent a week with my Aunt Kate and Grandfather, my mother's father.  He was old and when we left their house I remember my aunt and grandfather standing in the door.  My mot-her knew she would never see her father again.  She did not ever see either of them again.  My mother had five children: four boys and me, to make the trip back to Americawith her.  I never had a pair of shoes until I started to America.

     We were twenty-one days on the ship which was counted a very quick trip at that time.  When we started we took the train at a small place and went by train to Rio de Janerio, Brazil.  We took the ship there.  When the ship docked at New York a ferry boat met the ship.  We rode the ferry boat to shore.  We took the train at New York and went to Wills Point, Texas.  My father's brother met us there.  We stayed at his house about a week and my uncle, Joe Wright, came after us.  He lived in Camp County.  We lived with them two years, until my father got back to America.  It was three months before my brother got back.  We moved two miles from Quitman, Texas.  We lived on my Uncle Ep Wright's farm

      My grandfather, grandmother and one uncle were buried on my grandfather's farm.  At the last ac-count, a Mr. Gooslby owned the farm.  It was located seven miles from Winnsboro, Texas. 

     We lived two years on a Mr. Lively's place and one year on a Miller place one and a half miles from Quitman.  Then my father bought some land four miles north of Alba, Texas.  It was all in woods with no house on it.  He cut and hewed logs and invited the neighbors to the house raising. We cooked for the men at my brother's house.  My brother was Will Wright.

     My father lived on this place about fifteen years.  He died in October 1899.  He died on Friday morn-ing at 4:00 A. M. and my mother died the following Sunday night at 11:00 P. M.  There were seven chil-dren born to my father and mother;  I was the only girl.

Brice Substation, Clarendon Texas                1955
       

 

     I have written of my father's and mother's traveling and will try to write something of my life since I married. 
 
     I married J. H. Sanders in 1891.  A good man who died May 14, 1939.  There was born to us ten children.  One died in infancy;  raised nine to be grown and married.  I am visiting my oldest son, Elmer Sanders.  My home is in Wood County, Texas, where I make my home with my baby boy, Johnie Sanders, in Alba, Texas.  That is close to my husband's old home place.  I was born in 1873, makes me 82 years old.  I have one girl, Vera Sanders Hukill who lives at Grand Saline, Texas.  One boy lives at New London, Texas....David Sanders. One boy, Joe Sanders, lives close to me at Alba, Texas. One girl, Ada Sanders Morrison lives at Dallas, Texas.  One girl, Georgia Sanders McKay lives in my old home place.  One girl, Ruby Sanders Fitzgerald lives at Grapevine, Texas.  I have 31 grandchildren, 41 great grandchildren and 3 great great grandchildren.  I am writing this for Mr. & Mrs. Aubrey Sanders.
 
  Ada Sanders
 
  Alba, Texas

Jesse Wright's story further expands the Brazil im-migration story of Ada Elizabeth Wright Sanders. At the end of the Civil War, about 20,000 disgruntled Confederates immigrated to Brazil with the intentions of continuing the life style they had enjoyed before the war. Jesse Wright and his family were part of this group and joined the McMullen Group at Galveston Texas with 146 other Texans and 8 Louisiana Plant-ation owners.
The group's intentions were to charter a ship to Brazil. Suffering many delays the group finally sailed out of Galveston harbor on the Derby bound for Brazil. After 7 days at sea, the ship encountered a severe storm off the coast of Cuba and was ship wreaked. Luckily the wreak happened close enough to shore that all of the passengers and crew made it to shore without any casualties. Jess Wright shot and killed a Cuban who was attempting to steal ship stores and if not for ex-confederates in Cuba interceding for him would have probably been stood against a wall and shot.
The Brazilian Government arranged for the passen-gers to be picked up and sent to New York by Steamer to await the sailing of another ship bound for Brazil. The passengers had to wait about a month before another ship could be booked so they could continue their journey.

They were over a year on the trip before he finally located.  They were ship wrecked on the way.  They thought every minute the ship was going to sink.  My mother gathered her three little children around her knees and knelt down waiting for the ship with all afraid to sink.  Others were praying and crying and thinking the ship was going to sink. The captain got mad and just sat down, without trying to help the people get into life boats and my father went to him.  He talked to him and he got the life boats and all got saved before the ship went down.  My mother gave birth to a baby boy on the way.  He lived three months; they named him Charlie. He died and was buried on the Island of Cuba.  My father built  a rock tomb around the grave.

     After they got to Brazil, this colony of Americans camped on the banks of a large river.  (Name un-known.)*  There were no houses to live in.  They were camped in the wilderness.  They had to carry large knives to cut their way through.  They only had trails that they cut through the wilderness to travel.  When they got to where they could they cut poles and stood them on end 

Ada Wright Sanders at her home
                   in Alba, Texas 
SUSAN JANE GARNER

                                                                           GARNER FAMILY​

     Following  information  provided  by Ruby  Wallace - descendant  of  Thomas Garner/Lucinda Rogers.

According to the 1850 Benton Co., Ala. census, Thomas Garner was born in South Carolina.  His par-ents are not known.   Lucinda was listed on the 1850 census, but did not show up on the 1860 census of Hop-kins County, Texas with Thomas.  She apparently died, either in Alabama, on the trip to Texas, or in Texas.  There was a W. W. Garner, born about 1808, also in South Carolina, living next door to Thomas Garner in Benton County, Alabama in 1850.  This is probably a brother.


    It is known that Thomas Garner left Texas in 1866-1867 with a group of Southerners, which included his daughter, Susan Jane Garner Wright and her family, along with Thomas' daughter, Rachel Garner Russell.  Rachel, her husband, F. M., and one-year old son, Thomas, were living in Hopkins County in 1860 next door to her father, Thomas Garner.  It is believed that Rachel's husband was the Frank M. Russell who served in the 1st Tex. Vol. Inf. Regiment, Company 1, Crockett Southrons, organized in Houston Co., Texas and mustered into the war at New Orleans, June 24, 1861.  Frank M. Russell was recruited at Alto, Texas, March 22, 1862, was listed as sick in the summer of 1862 with rheumatism, sick in the fall of 1862 with typhoid fever, discharged from service with ulcerated leg on April 14, 1864.  Apparently Frank M. Russell, and the baby Thomas, died prior to 1866 because neither of them were mentioned in the stories that were told regarding the travels of the Americans who went to South America after the Civil War.  Perhaps they died from the typhoid fever which he had in 1862.  Rachel Russell was referred to as being a widow.


     It is not known what happened to the other children that belonged to Thomas Garner and Lucinda, with the exception of the son Edwin M. Garner who was listed in Thomas' household in the 1860 census records of Hopkins County, Texas.  Apparently Edwin M. Garner is the E. M. Garner who served in the 4th Texas Vol. Inf. Regiment, Co. 1, Navarro Rifles, which was organized in Navarro Co., Texas, enrolled there on July 17, 1861, and was mustered into the CSA at Richmond, Va. Sept. 30, 1861.  E. M. Garner was wounded in the head at Gaines' Mill June 27, 1862, was killed at the battle at Antietam on September 17, 1862.  It is not known where Edwin M. Garner was buried.


    After the Civil War, Susan Jane Garner Wright and family, along with her father, Thomas Garner, and sister, Rachel Garner Russell, set sail for Brazil, South America.  They were going to make this their home; however, due to trouble arising Susan and her children returned to Texas at the latter part of the 1880s.  Her husband and one son reached Texas about two years later.  She never saw her father or sister again.  They died and were buried in The Campo Cemetery, situated in Santa Barbara County (today Santa Barbara D'Oeste) Sao Paulo State, Brazil.  This cemetery was started in 1868 because of the prohibition of burying of non-Roman Catholics in the common official cemeteries, according to Imperial Brazilian law.  Neither Thomas Garner or Rachel Garner Russell Crawley have markers at this cemetery.


     Thomas Garner joined the Methodist Church in Santa Barbara about 1881.  The date of his death is not known.  Rachel Russell Crawley was also a member of this church.  Her death date is not known.

 

 

 

The following information is taken from writings by Ada Elizabeth Wright Sanders, Alba, Texas:  A Century to Remember, 1994, page 31-32.

"My father, Jesse Rosser Wright,  was so broken up after the Civil War, and the North whipping the South, that he sold out everything and went to South America.  Before he sold out he lived at Quitman Texas.  He owned and operated a dry goods store."

They were over a year making the trip to Brazil.  They joined a colony of Americans camped on the banks of a large river.  There were no houses.  They camped in the wilderness, cut poles and stood them on end and tied them together with Seaport Vines to make a one-room shack.  The men traveled 100 miles down-stream for provisions.  The women and children would stay in camp.

 

They later moved a long way to Retiro, about 4 miles from Santa Barbara, Brazil, into a three room house covered with grass and dirt.  Ada Elizabeth was born in this house

Jesse Rosser got into trouble and left Brazil with one of his sons.  After two years, Ada's mother sold everything and came back to America.  She and the children lived in Camp County with Jesse's brother, James C. Wright.  They lived there for two years until Jesse got back from South America.  They moved back to Quitman, TX. 

 

Jesse Rosser died on Friday, 1899, at 4:00 a.m.  His wife died the following Sunday at 11:00 p.m. 

                       

                                                                            MORE HISTORY

Susan Jane Garner was born December 27, 1835 in Benton County, Alabama, to Thomas and Lucinda ___?___ Garner.


   Susan Jane Garner states on her census records that she was born in Alabama.  It is not known exactly in what county she was born; however, in 1840 and 1850 her father, Thomas Garner was found living in Benton County.  I am assuming that Susan was born in that county.  Thomas Garner was living in Madi-son County, Tennessee in 1830.  On October 4, 1857, Jane was married to Jesse Rosser Wright.  This date was taken from their old Family Bible; however, it is not known in what county they were married.  They may have been married in Wood County, but the Wood County courthouse burned in 1879.  No marriage certificate has been found for them.  She and Jesse Wright appeared on the 1860 Wood County, Texas census record. Her father and one brother were found living in Hopkins County, Texas in 1860.  Since her mother was not listed, it is assumed that she had died; either in Alabama or Texas, or perhaps on the trip to Texas.


   After the Civil War, Susan Jane Garner Wright and family, along with her father, Thomas Garner, and sister, Rachel Garner Russell, set sail for Brazil, South America.  They were going to make this their home; however, due to trouble  Susan and her children returned to Texas at the latter part of the 1880s.  Her husband and one son reached Texas about two years later.  She never saw her father or sister again.  They died and were buried in The Campo Cemetery, situated in Santa Barbara County (today Santa Bar-bara D'Oeste) Sao Paulo State, Brazil.  This cemetery was started in 1868 because of the prohibition of burying of non-Roman Catholics in the common official cemeteries, according to Imperial Brazilian law.  Neither Thomas Garner or Rachel Garner Russell Crawley have markers at this cemetery.
   
   Susan Jane Garner Wright returned to Wood County, Texas shortly before 1880, where she appeared on the Wood County census record, living with her brother-in-law, Joseph Wright and his family.  Her husband, Jesse Rosser Wright, and one son, followed a few years later.


   Susan Jane Garner Wright died in Wood County, Texas on October 29, 1899, just two days after her husband, and was buried in the Old Salem Cemetery.  This cemetery is now covered by the waters of Lake Fork; however, prior to the building of this lake, the remains of all those in the cemetery were removed to a new Old Salem Cemetery a few miles from the old one.  Since Susan Jane did not have a marker, her re-mains were placed in a grave that she now shares with all the rest of those that did not have a marker.  The tombstone states "Herein Lie The Remains of Unknown Persons Formerly Buried in Old Salem Cemetery".

The following information is taken from writings by Ada Elizabeth Wright Sanders, Alba, Texas:  A Century to Remember, 1994, page 31-32.

"My father, Jesse Rosser Wright,  was so broken up after the Civil War, and the North whipping the South, that he sold out everything and went to South America.  Before he sold out he lived at Quitman Texas.  He owned and operated a dry goods store."

They were over a year making the trip to Brazil.  They joined a colony of Americans camped on the banks of a large river.  There were no houses.  They camped in the wilderness, cut poles and stood them on end and tied them together with Seaport Vines to make a one-room shack.  The men traveled 100 miles downstream for provisions.  The women and children would stay in camp. 

They later moved a long way to Retiro, about 4 miles from Santa Barbara, Brazil, into a three room house covered with grass and dirt.  Ada Elizabeth was born in this house. 

Jesse Rosser got into trouble and left Brazil with one of his sons.  After two years, Ada's mother sold everything and came back to America.  She and the children lived in Camp County with Jesse's brother, James C. Wright.  They lived there for two years until Jesse got back from South America.  They moved back to Quitman, TX. 

Jesse Rosser died on Friday, 1899, at 4:00 a.m.  His wife died the following Sunday at 11:00 p.m.                             

LEFT -- ADA E. WRIGHT AND JOHN HENRY SANDERS

BELOW -- ELMER BEAUREGARD SANDERS & FAMILY

ADA AND HER GIRLS------------------Ruby,Vera,Venazuela,Ada,Maisy,Georgia Sanders

ADA AND HER BOYS ---------------JOHNNIE, JOE, ELMER, ADA AND DAVE

MANIFEST - CITY OF PARA  -  RIO TO NEW YORK     AUGUST 1879

         SUSANAND CHILDREN: DAVID, BEAUREFGARD, JOSEPH, ADA AND AMBROSE 

New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957

 

Name    Susan J Wright

Arrival Date      26 Aug 1879

Birth Date      abt 1842

Age     37

Gender     Female

Ethnicity/ Nationality    American

Place of Origin     United States of America

Port of Departure     Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Destination  United States of America

Port of Arrival   lNew York, New York

Ship NameCity of Para

Search Ship DatabaseCity of Para

Susan J Wright - Aug 1879 - New York, New York Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - Female - City of Para