Caroline A McRae was born on June 4, 1831, in North Carolina, her father, Daniel, was 49, and her mother, Martha, was 20. She married William "Wiley" Smith and they had three children together. She then married Duncan Nathaniel Patterson and they had two children together. She died as a young mother on April 30, 1863, in Richmond, North Carolina, at the age of 31, and was buried there.

Caroline McRae Patterson

Birth: Jun. 4, 1831

Death: Apr. 30, 1863
Mangum
Richmond County
North Carolina, USA

 

 

Burial:
Old Hebron Methodist Church Cemetery 
Mangum
Richmond County
North Carolina, USA

Dr William Wiley" Smith, 1st Husband of Caroline A. McRae 
Dr. William "Wiley" Smith was born in 1815 in Wadesboro, Anson County, North Carolina. He married Caroline A McRae on September 1, 1847 in Wadesboro, Anson County.  He died  after a protracted illness, in Richmond County, North Carolina. They had three children during their marriage. He died on March 7, 1855, in Richmond County, North Carolina at the age of 40.

1850 United States Federal Census

Name:  Caroline Smith

Age:  20

Birth Year:  abt 1830

Birthplace:  North Carolina

Home in 1850:  Fair Ground, Richmond, North Carolina, USA

Gender:  Female

Family Number:  803

Household Members:

Name   Age

Wyley Smith   35

Caroline Smith   20

Walter Smith   2

Louisa Barns   32

Frances Barns   9

John Gay   29

1860 United States Federal Census

Name:  Caroline Patterson

Age:  29

Birth Year:  abt 1831

Gender:  Female

Birth Place:  North Carolina

Home in 1860:Steeles, Richmond, North Carolina

Post Office:  Mangum

Family Number:  23

Value of real estate:  View image

Household Members:

Name    Age

D N Patterson    34

Caroline Patterson    29

Walden Patterson      11

Williams Patterson     5

Elizabeth Andrews10    5

CAROLINE AND WILEY HAD THREE CHILDREN:
1.  WALTER D. SMITH
2.  MARTHA ADELLE SMITH
3.  WILLIAM ALEXANDER SMITH SR.
1.  Walter D. Smith
Walter D. Smith was born in 1848 in North Carolina, his father, William, was 33 and his mother, Caroline, was 17. He lost his father when he was only 7 years old.   In the 1860 census his name shows as Walter Patterson, the last name of his stepfather.  No further record found after 1860.
2.  Martha Adelle Smith
 
Martha Adelle Smith was born on April 26, 1851, her father, William, was 36, and her mother, Caroline, was 19.  She died as a child on August 8, 1852.  No records have been found except entries in the McRae family bible.
3.  William Alexander Smith  Sr.
 
William Alexander Smith was born on December 23, 1855, in Richmond, North Carolina, his father, William, was 40 and his mother, Caroline, was 24. He married Elizabeth Brown "Bettie" Alexander on January 19, 1883, in Wadesboro, Anson County, North Carolina. They had two children during their marriage. He died on December 29, 1927 of pnuemonia, in Steeles, Richmond County, North Carolina at the age of 72.  His wife,  Elizabeth Brown "Bettie" Alexander was born on December 9, 1860, in Wadesboro, Anson County, North Carolina, her father, Samuel Craighead Caldwell Alexander, was 30, and her mother, Mary Holmes Brown, was 25.  They had two children during their marriage. She died on November 10, 1939 of heart disease, in Steeles, Richmond County, North Carolina, at the age of 78.  William and Bettie are both buried at The Old Hebron Methodist Church Cemetery in Mangum, Richmond County, North Carolina

William Alexander Smith

Birth: Dec. 23, 1855
Richmond County
North Carolina, USA

Death: Dec. 30, 1927
Mangum
Richmond County
North Carolina, USA

 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Betty Brown Alexander Smith (1860 - 1969)*
 
*Calculated relationship

 

Burial:
Old Hebron Methodist Church Cemetery 
Mangum
Richmond County
North Carolina, USA

Betty Brown Alexander Smith

Birth: Dec. 9, 1860
Wadesboro
Anson County
North Carolina, USA

Death: Nov. 10, 1969
Mangum
Richmond County
North Carolina, USA

 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Samuel Craighead Caldwell Alexander (1830 - 1907)
  Betty Brown Alexander Smith (1860 - 1969)
 
 Spouse:
  William Alexander Smith (1855 - 1927)
 
 Children:
  Betty Brown Alexander Smith (1860 - 1969)*
 
 Sibling:
  Betty Brown Alexander Smith (1860 - 1969)
  Robert Owen Alexander (1864 - 1926)**
 
*Calculated relationship
**Half-sibling

 

Burial:
Old Hebron Methodist Church Cemetery 
Mangum
Richmond County
North Carolina, USA

First son of William and Bettie:
1.  Samuel Wiley Smith Sr.
 
Samuel Wiley Smith was born on February 12, 1884, in Richmond, North Carolina, his father, William, was 28 and his mother, Elizabeth, was 23.  He died on January 26, 1936, at the age of 51 from heart disease and is buried at The Old hebron Methodist Church Cemetery in Mangum, Richmond County, North Carolina.  His wife, Shirley Douglas Manees was born on February 19, 1895, in Arkansas, her father, William Robert Manees, was 39, and her mother, Annie,McGhee was 22. She had one son with Samuel Wiley Smith in 1918. She died on March 5, 1993, in Memphis, Tennessee, at the age of 98, and was buried there.  One of four daughters born to William and Annie. Mary Manees Oglesby. Minnie Lawson Manees Arnold. Shirley Douglas Manees Smith, and Eugenia Manees Willey. 

Sam W. Smith

Birth: Feb. 12, 1884

Death: Jan. 26, 1936
Mangum
Richmond County
North Carolina, USA

 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Shirley Douglas Manees Smith (1895 - 1993)*
 
 Children:
  S. Wiley Smith (1918 - 1999)*
 
*Calculated relationship

 

Burial:
Old Hebron Methodist Church Cemetery 
Mangum
Richmond County
North Carolina, USA

FIND A GRAVE

Shirley Douglas Manees Smith

Birth: Feb. 19, 1895

Death: Mar. 5, 1993
Memphis
Shelby County
Tennessee, USA


One of 4 daughters born to William Robert Manees and Anna McGhee. Mary Manees Oglesby. Minnie Lawson Manees Arnold. Shirley Douglas Manees Smith, and Eugenia Manees Willey. 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Sam W. Smith (1884 - 1936)
 
 Children:
  S. Wiley Smith (1918 - 1999)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Note: section G

 

Burial:
Memorial Park Cemetery 
Memphis
Shelby County
Tennessee, USA

Samuel Wiley Smith was born on June 17, 1918, in Arkansas, his father, Samuel, was 34 and his mother, Shirley, was 23. He died on October 11, 1999, in Jonesboro, Arkansas, at the age of 81, and was buried there.
S. Wiley Smith, Jr. (only son of Shirley Manees and Samuel W. Smith) The Smith family came from NC and the Manees family from Memphis.

*Served in the Army Air Corp. during WWII.
*Ret. from Southwestern Bell Telephone after 38 yrs.
*Was an active member in the First Presbyterian Church.
Betty Jo Bynum was born on August 1, 1935, in Blytheville, Arkansas, her father, William, was 44, and her mother, Essie, was 42. She married Rex Garland Lovell on March 6, 1956, in Indiana. She died on July 7, 2009, in Jonesboro, Arkansas, at the age of 73, and was buried there.


JONESBORO — Betty J. Smith, 73, of Jonesboro passed peacefully Tuesday evening, July 7, at St. Bernards Medical Center at Jonesboro, surrounded by her family.

Born in Blytheville, Betty lived much of her life in Jonesboro. She was a graduate of Armorel High School, a homemaker and a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Jonesboro.

She was preceded in death by her husband, S. Wiley Smith.

The family sends their appreciation to Dr. General Lee Cranfill for his sincere care and genuine kindness, which extended Betty's quality of life, and a thank you to the nurses and staff of St. Bernards Medical Center for true professionalism and service.

Survivors include two daughters, Charmain Smith Harless of Cabot and Leslie Smith Medford of Jonesboro; one son, Steven W. Smith of Jonesboro; one sister, Juanita Carter of Jonesboro; several grandchildren; and several great-grandchildren.

Graveside funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. today with the Rev. J.T. Medford officiating and Emerson Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.

Pallbearers include Garry Harless, Jeremy Medford, Matt Murray, Maurice Murray, Andrew Stevenson and Mike Perryman.

There will be no visitation.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks that consideration be given in Betty's name to the charity of the donor's choice.

jonesborosun.com/obituaries. July 9, 2009.

 

Betty J. Smith

Birth: Aug. 1, 1935
Blytheville
Mississippi County
Arkansas, USA

Death: Jul. 7, 2009
Jonesboro
Craighead County
Arkansas, USA

S. Wiley Smith, Jr

Birth: Jun. 17, 1918

Death: Oct. 11, 1999


S. Wiley Smith, Jr. (only son of Shirley Manees and Samuel W. Smith) The Smith family came from NC and the Manees family from Memphis.

*Served in the Army Air Corp. during WWII.
*Ret. from Southwestern Bell Telephone after 38 yrs.
*Was an active member in the First Presbyterian Church.

Paternal Surnames: SMITH/ALEXANDER/BROWNE/CALDWELL/CRAIGHEAD
Maternal Surnames: MANEES/McGHEE/LAWSON/DOUGLAS 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Sam W. Smith (1884 - 1936)
  Shirley Douglas Manees Smith (1895 - 1993)
 
 Spouse:
  Betty J. Bynum Smith (1935 - 2009)
 
Note: Almost black stone. Double Marker.

 

Burial:
Kellers Chapel Cemetery 
Jonesboro
Craighead County
Arkansas, USA

Sam and Betty Jo had three children:
1.  Charmain Smith
2.  Leslie Smith
3.  Steven W. Smith
Second son of William and Bettie
2.  ​William Alexander Smith
 
William Alexander Smith was born on July 14, 1894, in Steeles, North Carolina, his father, William, was 38 and his mother, Elizabeth, was 33. He had one brother. He died on December 22, 1974 of heart disease, in Charlotte, North Carolina, at the age of 80and is buried at the Old Hebron Methodist Church Cemetery in Mangum, Richmond County, North Carolina.  He never married.   He was a farmer and during the last period of her life, Bettie, his mother, came to live with him on his farm.

M. Alexander Smith, Jr

Birth: Jul. 14, 1894

Death: Dec. 22, 1974
Mangum
Richmond County
North Carolina, USA


WWI U.S. Navy 

 

Burial:
Old Hebron Methodist Church Cemetery 
Mangum
Richmond County
North Carolina, USA

William and Bettie were the parents of two sons:
1.  Samuel Wiley Smith Sr
2.  William Alexander Smith Jr.
Dr Douglas N. Patterson, 2nd Husband of Caroline A. McRae 
Duncan Nathaniel Patterson was born in 1825 in West End, North Carolina, his father, Daniel, was 47 and his mother, Nancy, was 33. He married Caroline A McRae and they had two children together. He also had one son and two daughters with his 2nd wife, Mary Jane Christian. He died on June 22, 1904, in Charlotte, North Carolina, having lived a long life of 79 years, and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery in Charlotte.

Duncan Nathaniel Patterson

Birth: Nov. 23, 1825
Moore County
North Carolina, USA

Death: Jun. 22, 1904
Charlotte
Mecklenburg County
North Carolina, USA

 
Family links: 
 Children:
  Janie Patterson Pritchett (1874 - 1954)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Inscription:
Son of Daniel and Annie Johnson Patterson

 

Burial:
Elmwood Cemetery 
Charlotte
Mecklenburg County
North Carolina, USA
Plot: Section M

          CSA
        Pardon
    Application
1880 United States Federal Census

NameDuncan Patterson

Age53

Birth Yearabt 1827

BirthplaceNorth Carolina

Home in 1880Steeles, Richmond, North Carolina

RaceWhite

GenderMale

Relation to Head of HouseSelf

Marital StatusWidower

Father's BirthplaceNorth Carolina

Mother's BirthplaceScotland

OccupationPhysician

Household Members

NameAge

Duncan Patterson53

Carrie Patterson19

Annie E. Patterson11

Jane C. Patterson5

Eliza Christian57

From the book, THE REVEREND JOHN TILLETT FAMILY HISTORY, by Charles W. Allison (1955)

Perhaps the one act that brought him most forcefully to public attention occurred in Charlotte in May 1926, when a Committee of One Hundred, a Fundamentalist group, met to plan steps to secure legislation that would prohibit the schools of North Carolina from teaching the theory of evolution. During a brief pause in the proceedings, while the Resolutions Committee was temporarily off the floor, Tillett and a group of his friends, all university alumni, received permission to speak. Tillett taunted the Fundamentalists by asking whether they intended to destroy free speech and free thought. Reportedly his remark "brought on a tumult" and in large measure contributed to the failure of this committee to achieve its objective. Tillett also spoke effectively before legislative committees on behalf of freedom of research and teaching. North Carolina was spared the infamy that befell several other states on this question.

After World War II Tillett became a champion of "peace by world law." As an observer, he attended the 1945 conference in San Francisco at which the United Nations Charter was adopted and reported on the proceedings for the Charlotte News. He later spoke and wrote extensively in support of the United Nations, and his writings were reprinted and widely distributed. On his own initiative as well as through membership in the American Bar Association, Tillett succeeded in defeating a proposed amendment to the Constitution offered in 1952 by Senator John W. Bricker of Ohio and more than sixty others that would have imposed far-reaching restrictions on the treaty-making powers of the U.S. president and the Senate. (The amendment proposed that the House of Representatives and each of the state legislatures have the right to reject a treaty.) His testimony before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations undoubtedly contributed to the failure of this proposal.

He was a Presbyterian and an active Democrat, attending the Democratic National Convention of 1944. In 1917 he married Gladys Love Avery, and they had three children: Charles W. III, M.D., Gladys (Mrs. William I. Coddington), and Sara Avery (Mrs. William Wayt Thomas, Jr.).

Tillett, Charles Walter, Jr.

by James B. Craighill, 1996

6 Feb. 1888–23 Dec. 1952

Charles Walter Tillett, Jr., attorney and civic leader, was born in MangumRichmond County, the son of Carrie Patterson and Charles W. Tillett. He attended the Charlotte public schools and Webb School at Bell Buckle, Tenn., from which he was graduated in 1905. At The University of North Carolina, where he received the A.B. degree in 1909, he was elected to membership in Phi Beta Kap- pa and the Order of the Golden Fleece; he was an intercollegiate debater and president of the Dialectic Society. He also studied law at the university, was admitted to the bar in 1911, and established a practice in Charlotte. In 1918 he entered the Officers' Training Corps; commissioned in the Fiftieth Infantry, he was discharged as a captain in 1919. Image of Charles Walter Tillet, Jr., from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Yackety Yack Year-   book, [p. 63], published 1909 by the Univeristy of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Presented on Internet Archive.

As a member of the school board in Charlotte, Tillett was noted for his championship of a fair distribution of public school funds for the benefit of black children. He was a leader in the Citizens Library Movement, which obtained state support for countywide library service, and in Charlotte he served on the board of directors of the Symphony Society and helped to establish the Mint Museum of Art.

Tillett, Gladys Love Avery

by Carolyn Roff, 1996

19 Mar. 1892–21 Sept. 1984

.Gladys Love Avery Tillett, political leader and proponent of equal rights for women, was born in Morganton. Her parents were Judge A. C. Avery of the North Carolina Supreme Court and his wife, Sarah Love Thomas. Her paternal great-grandfather,Waightstill Avery, was the first attorney general of the state. On her mother's side her great-grandfather was William Holland Thomas, white chief of the Cherokee Indians. She was graduated from the North Carolina College for Women in 1915, where she was influenced by Professor Harriet Elliott, and received a second bachelor's degree from The University of North Carolina in 1917 with a major in political science. She became interested in the issue of women's rights, and while her husband was serving in the army during World War I, she continued her studies at Columbia University; in New York she also engaged in social work.

Her interest in politics never wavered throughout her life. From 1920 until her death, she cast her ballot for every Democratic presidential nominee. While her husband, an important Charlottelawyer and onetime president of the state bar, pursued his professional career with an occasional foray into support of some public cause, Gladys Tillett pursued a career in politics.

In Charlotte she was active with the YWCA and the Business and Professional Women's Club and also performed with the Charlotte Little Theater. Beginning in the 1930s Mrs. Tillett held numerous positions in the Democratic party and in 1936 was director of the Speakers Bureau of the Women's Division of the Democratic National Committee—a post she held again in 1940. This required her to find thousands of speakers for different women's groups nationwide.

In 1943 she became the first woman to be named assistant to the chairman of the Democratic National Convention. The next year she became the first woman to address the convention, and she returned to address it again in 1948. Her work as an observer at the 1945 founding conference of the United Nations in San Francisco helped her when she worked with UNESCO in 1949.

These national activities kept her in the spotlight and busy, but she did make time for other activities. She served on the State Board of Electionsand organized the first county League of Women Voters in North Carolina. From 1961 to 1966 she was a delegate to the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, and in the 1970s she was active in support of the Equal Rights Amendment. She once remarked to a reporter: "It's my highest ambition to be free and equal. I may have missed it by a few years, but I want it to end that way." She found sincere satisfaction in politics. "Women in the South are very interested in politics and very active," she once observed. "This is all nonsense about the Southern woman devoting herself exclusively to home activities."

Mrs. Tillett was awarded LL.D. degrees from the Woman's College in Greensboro and The University of North Carolina and the L.H.D. degree fromQueens College. In 1917 she married Charles Walter Tillett, Jr., of Charlotte, and they had three children: Charles W. III, Gladys, and Sara. A Presbyterian, she was buried in Elmwood Cemetery, Charlotte.

L>R: US Ambassador to Luxembourg Perle Mesta, First Lady Bess Truman, Treasurer of the United States Mrs. Georgia Neese Clark, Democratic National Committee Vice-Chair India Edwards, and Mrs. Gladys Avery Tillett; Photographer: Julia King; Harry S. Truman Library & Museum

Gladys A. Tillet Dies; An Activist Democrat

Published: October 3, 1984  New York Times

Gladys A. Tillet, who was an official in the Democratic Party and a former United States representative to the United Nations commission on women, died Sept. 21 in Charlotte, N.C. She was 92 years old.

She devoted half a century to political activism.

In the 1920's she fought to permit the teaching of the theory of evolution in Tennessee. In the 1970's, she served as president of a statewide group lobbying for passage of a Federal equal rights amendment.

''I happened to graduate about when women go the vote, and I organized the first county chapter of the League of Women Voters in 1921,'' Mrs. Tillett once said in an interview.

She became president of the league in North Carolina and then rose higher than any previous woman in the Democratic Party. From 1940 to 1950 she served as assistant chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

In 1944, Mrs. Tillett gave a keynote speech at the Democratic convention in Chicago and shared a radio campaign broadcast with President Roosevelt.

''Winning the war, jobs, security, and winning the peace are all concerns to American women,'' she said in an interview in 1944. The next year she was an observer at the founding conference of the United Nations.

In 1961 Mrs. Tillet was named United States representative to the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. She supported motions urging member nations to provide women equal pay for equal work and for establishing a minimum age for marriage.

Her father, A. C. Avery, was a Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court.

Mrs. Tillet is survived by her three children, Dr. Charles Tillett and Gladys Coddington, of Charlotte, and Sarah Thomas, of Washington; ten grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren.

Wayt Thomas graduated from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (1973) in Botany and obtained his PhD in Botany from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1982). He has been working at The New York Botanical Garden since 1983 and is now the Elizabeth G. Britton Curator of Botany in the Garden's Institute of Systematic Botany.

 

His field experience covers all tropical American biomes with recent emphasis on eastern Brazil and Cuba. His research interests include systematics of Neotropical plants (especially the families Cyperaceae, Simaroubaceae and Picramniaceae), and the vegetation, Biogeography, and conservation of the Atlantic forests of northeastern Brazil.

Sara Tillett Thomas died at home, surrounded by family, on Dec. 15, 2013, in Pittsburgh, Pa.

She was born in Charlotte, N.C., on Aug. 18, 1925, to Gladys Avery Tillett and Charles Walter Tillett, Jr. She received a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in English literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

In 1948, she married William Wayt Thomas, Jr. He joined the U.S. Foreign Service and the Thomases lived in East and Southeast Asia. When not posted overseas, the Thomases lived in the Washington, D.C. area.

Under the pen name Ruth Evans, Sara was the author of a children’s book, “The Jungle of Tonza Mara.” She was also a dedicated teacher. She taught English at Woodrow Wilson High School in Washington, D.C., from 1965-1970. She also taught college-level English literature at National Taiwan University, and at Beijing University. After her husband’s retirement in 1990, they lived in Vienna, Va., and later in Arlington, Va.

This 1907 Buick was driven to Charlotte by C.C. Coddington and Lee Folger. The photograph was taken on the muddy National Highway between Salisbury and Lexington, North Carolina.

Dr. William H. Huffman
January, 1985

The Coddington House, one of the few stately homes remaining on the Dilworth section of Morehead Street, has more the appearance of a New England summer home than that of a formal residence one would expect to find on a major boulevard of a fashionable neighborhood. Nonetheless, the house, built by Charles Campbell and Marjorie Lyon Coddington in 1917 from the plans of Charlotte architect William Peeps, was well suited for a style of life that centered around frequent entertaining of guests.

Charles Campbell Coddington (1878-1928) was the epitome of an energetic, enterprising young man out to make his fortune in turn-of-the-century America. He had worked as a reporter for the New York Evening Journal in his early twenties, but the New Jersey native restlessly sought a commercial venture suitable for his energy and talents, and settled on the fledgling automobile industry as having the most potential. In 1907, the three-year-old Buick Motor Company granted him exclusive rights to be its distributor for the Carolinas, and the confident young man set out for Charlotte. While driving the first Buick south of the Mason- Dixon line, Coddington stopped in Greensboro at a drug store, where by chance he saw a young woman who had recently been voted the most beautiful in North Carolina. He was so taken with her that he decided on the spot to stay in Greensboro until he could meet this charming beauty, and plans to open his business were laid aside.

 

It took a month for him to manage an introduction, and his persistent courtship resulted in marriage a year later to Marjorie Lyon. 

Although she was a native of Thomasville, N.C., Marjorie Lyon Coddington (1884-1925) had grown up in Greensboro in the home of her parents, Edward West and Minnie Rinehurt Lyon. Six months after her marriage to C.C. Coddington in 1908, the couple moved to Charlotte in January, 1909 2 and first took up residence on East Boulevard in Dilworth. By 1911, they had moved to a house at 603 South Tryon Street, just beyond Stonewall, and C.C. had set up a Buick distributorship, garage and automobile supply company at 209 S. Church Street. About 1913, they moved again, this time back out of town to the first block of West Morehead Street, and started their family. 3

C. C. Coddington's business instincts had served him brilliantly; not only had he chosen to enter a business that experienced explosive growth in the teens and twenties, he did so in a city whose growth matched that of the automobile industry. As a banking and distribution center which served the Piedmont Carolinas, Charlotte experienced a sustained boom from the 1880s to the end of the 1920s in playing a key role in the New South industrialization centering around the proliferation of cotton mills in the region.

 

The combination of his business skills and being in the right place at the right time proved to be fruitful indeed. Sometime about early 1917, the Coddingtons decided to build a new home on the extension of East Morehead Street in Dilworth, the city's first streetcar suburb, at the corner of what was first known as Coddington Avenue (now Berkeley Avenue). To design the new suburban residence, they hired one of Charlotte's most skilled architects, William Peeps. The basic H-pattern and general appearance were patterned after an old family home of Marjorie Coddington's forebearers in Carlile, Pa., the Eliot Farm house.

 

William Peeps (1868-1950) was a native of London, England, who came to Charlotte in 1905 to begin a career in the Queen City which spanned forty-five years. During that time a number of the most impressive structures of the city were produced in his office. Among his admirable commercial designs were the Latta Arcade (1914, for Edward Dilworth Latta, the developer of Dilworth), the Court Arcade (1927-8), Ivey's Department Store (1920s), and Ratcliffe Flowers (1929). For many of the leading citizens of Charlotte and surrounding communities he created Colonial Revival, English Tudorand other styles which provided the area with a rich architectural heritage. The latter include the Lethco house on Roswell, the Wilson house at Providence and Queens Roads, and the residences of John Bass Brown (East Boulevard), William Porcher (Queens Road West), J.B. Ivey, Osmond Barringer (Sherwood) and Lee A. Folger (Coddington's business manager and next door neighbor on Morehead). 

 

The suburb they chose for their new residence, Dilworth, was being developed by the Charlotte Consolidated Construction Company (known as the 4C's), which was formed by Edward Dilworth Latta in 1890. It was made possible by its lifeline to the center city, a new electric streetcar system that ran from the Square to Latta Park at the heart of the city's first suburb. In its heyday, the park which surrounded a large lake, was the site of sporting events and traveling shows in its pavillion, and it also served as an outdoor social center. From the beginning, Dilworth had a wide range of houses, from the large homes of the well-to-do on the main boulevards (East and South Boulevards, and Morehead Street), to the modest homes on the side streets, and even some mill houses on the south side which belonged to the Atherton Cotton Mill off South Boulevard. Latta himself built his own mansion on East Boulevard where the Greek Orthodox Church now stands. 

When the house was finished in late 1917 or early 1918, the Coddingtons moved in and began to turn it into one of the city's best known centers of hospitality.  As the years progressed, C.C. Coddington's business prospered to the point where he became one of the area's wealthiest men. During World War I, he bought his own train of about 60 cars to ensure delivery of autos from Flint, Michigan, and was, as a consequence, the only distributor with a large stock of cars on hand to meet the demand at war's end.8 In 1925, C. C. Coddington experienced both tragedy and triumph. In February, Marjorie Coddington died suddenly of heart failure at the age of forty, leaving three young sons, C. C. Jr., 11, Dabney Minor, 9, and William, 7. The Observer described her as "a leader in social and civic activities, having had a reputation as being an exceptionally fine hostess." 

 

That same year he completed the Coddington Building on West Trade Street (now the site of the newly renovated State Office Building), and bought radio station WBT (the first to go on the air in the Carolinas, 1920). The station was moved from the Independence Building to Coddington's, the power boosted to 500 watts from 100 and an advertising slogan was invented for the call letters: "Watch Buick Travel." In addition to being one of the organizers of the Charlotte Motor Speedway, he also raised thoroughbred horses on his 5000-acre estate in Jacksonville, N.C. (where he hosted meetings of his Carolinas dealers), was a state boxing commissioner, and in 1928 was elected president of the National Association of Automobile Dealers. When C. C. Coddington died unexpectedly on his yacht in Pamlico Sound, the city and state lost one of its most colorful citizens. 

 

Following the death of Marjorie Coddington in 1925, C. C. swapped the Morehead Street house for the Duke mansion in Myers Park the following year, and the Dukes sold it in turn to Nash dealer Armistead Burwell. 11 After Burwell lost the house during the Depression, it had a series of owners who continued to use it as a well-designed place for entertaining. (Roy and Ethel Goode, 1939-1944; Jerry and Billie Huber, 1944-48; Lee and Loraine Kinney, 1948-76; 12 (the Kinney's annual April lawn party drew nearly 300 guests in its later years.) 13 The tradition of hospitality remains today, with the present owners, headed by Nancy Bergmann, who have turned it into a comfortable place which once again accommodates guests, but this time as a country inn, The Morehead.

Dr. Charles Walter Tillett

OBITUARY:

Dr. Charles Walter Tillett, 91, died Oct. 19, 2011, at Presbyterian Hospital. Born Aug. 14, 1920, in Charlotte, Dr. Tillett was a son of the late Charles Tillett Jr. and Gladys Avery, a leader in the women’s suffrage movement.

He attended school in Charlotte and at Woodberry Forest School in Orange, Va., before attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he was a member of the wrestling team, the university’s yearbook team and Phi Beta Kappa. He was inducted into the Order of the Golden Fleece at the school.

He later received his medical degree at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and performed his residency at Wilmer Eye Institute, where he met his wife, Grace Montana.

 

He and his wife opened the Tillett Eye Clinic in 1954 and worked there until retiring in 1987. He was later featured in an article in the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

His wife and sister Gladys Tillett Coddington preceded him in death.

Survivors include his children Charles Tillett IV and wife, Maureen, of Wayland, Mass., Avery Tillett Ke and husband, Yan, of Southern Pines, and James Tillett, of Charlotte; sister Sara Tillett Thomas, of Pittsburgh, Pa.; and five grandchildren.

Visitation takes place Thursday, Oct. 27, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Harry & Bryant Company. A funeral service will be held Friday, Oct. 28, at 2 p.m. at Myers Park Presbyterian Church.

Memorials: Victory Vision Care, 7415 Coffey Creek Drive, Charlotte, NC 28273.

Grace Montana Tillett, American ophthalmologist, real estate developer. Diplomate American Board Radiology, American Board Ophthalmology.

Tillett, Grace Montana was born on December 5, 1924 in Malone, New York, United States. Daughter of Everett Reed and Althea Adela Manson Montana.

Bachelor, Syracuse University, 1946. Doctor of Medicine, Syracuse University, 1949.

Intern Baltimore City Hospitals, 1949—1950. Resident 1950Balt. City Hospitals, 1950—1951, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, 1951—1953. Private practice opthalmology Charlotte, North Carolina, from 1957.

Vice president Professor Optical Service, from 1965.

Diplomate American Board Radiology, American Board Ophthalmology.

Party affiliation: IndependentMember staff Presbyterian Mercy, Charlotte Memorial Hospitals. Board directors Heart Association, 1971—1973, Dance Charlotte, 1978—1979. Member of American Medical Association, Charlotte Ophthalmol.

Mecklenburg County Medical Society, North Carolina Medical Society, American Academy Radiology, American Academy Ophthalmology, Business & Professional Women's Association, Charlotte Country Club.

James Manson Tillett, 54, of Charlotte, NC died at home on Tuesday March 27, 2012 of lung cancer and COPD. Born September 23, 1957, he was the son of the late Charles W. Tillett III, M.D. and Grace M. Tillett M.D.. 

James attended Charlotte Country Day School in Charlotte and transferred to the Arlington School in Belmont, MA, where he received his high school diploma. He attended classes at Boston University before moving to Connecticut. There he converted to Catholicism and attended mass faithfully at Saint Sebastian Church of Middletown, CT while working at a local furniture company. He returned to Charlotte in 1988 and took classes in computer programming at UNC-Charlotte, thus beginning a passion for computing and technology that would last to the end of his life. 

James was brilliant from the start of his life - teaching himself to read by the time he was three and showing a marked aptitude in science and mathematics. He was sweet and funny as well as clever. But his early promise was marred by the onset of schizophrenia as a young adult in the 1970s when both the medication and the social stigma were worse than today, and in a worldly sense he did not reach his potential. However, to his friends and family members, James was a man of warmth and accomplishments. He was the go-to man: setting up a new computer for a friend, solving a complicated math problem (in his head) for his niece, getting the home entertainment system to work for his father, or doing business accounts for his mother. He was quiet but courteous and warm; he spoke little but always was ready to help. He held his faith privately but unfailingly. 

As his parents aged, James moved back into the house to care for them, shopping, cooking, and doing errands. His physical presence and emotional support made it possible for them to live comfortably at home. Equally important was the peace of mind this gave his out-of-town siblings. After his mother's death, he became his father's main companion. They supported each other and became the source of comfort for each other. 

The onset of lung cancer constrained James physically, but he continued to find spiritual solace from reading the Scripture and St. Augustine, as well as intellectual stimulation from the latest technologies --- in his last months, he was running programs in the Pascal computer language on his iPad! It is only fitting and more than mere chance that James chose to live out his final years this way: committed to his religious faith as well as connected with new technologies. He is fondly remembered and will be thoroughly missed by all of his family members and friends. 

He is survived by his brother, Charles W. Tillett IV of Boston, MA and his sister, Avery Tillett Ke of Southern Pines, NC. 

A private graveside ceremony was held on Friday March 30, 2012 at Evergreen Cemetery. 

Arrangements were handled by Harry & Bryant Company.

Carrie MacRae Tillett was born on December 23, 1894, her father, Charles, was 37, and her mother, Carrie, was 34. She had four brothers and two sisters. She died as a child on December 25, 1895, in Charlotte, North Carolina, and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery.

"The Lord Gave, and the Lord Taken Away."

Carrie McRae, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Tillett, died Christmas morning at their home on North Tryon street, and the funeral services were conducted yesterday morning at 10:30 be Rev. Dr. Bays, assisted by Rev. Dr. Preston. A large number of friends gathered to express by their presence their sympathy for the bereaved parents. the services were sweet and simple, and about an hour after there was a new little mound in Elmwood.                        
The pall-bearers were Messrs. E. T. Cansler, Heriot Clarkson, C. P. Wheeler and C. W. Parker.

Charlotte Observer
Friday, December 27, 1895
Page 4 

Nettie AllisonTillett was born in Charlotte on December 15, 1898, her father, Charles, was 41, and her mother, Carrie, was 38. She had four brothers and two sisters. She died on December 19, 1898, within a year of her birth, and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery, Charlotte, North Carolina.

Death of an infant.                                                                                                .

The infant daughter, Nettie Allison, of Mr. and Mrs. C.W. Tillett, died yesterday morning at 4 o'clock. It will be buried to-day at 11 o'clock. Services will be conducted at the residence by Rev. Drs. H.F. Chreltzberg and J.W. Stagg. The pall-bearers will be: Messrs. E.T. Cansler, C.W. Parker, J.D. McCall and F.M. Shannonhouse.                            .

Charlotte Observer                          .                
12.20.1898 

JOHN T. TILLETT SR. and HAZEL MARTIN HAD THREE CHILDREN:
1.  John T. Tillett Jr.
2.  Hugh Martin Tillett
3.  Caroline McRae Tillett
1.  John T. Tillett Jr.
John T. Tillett Jr. was born on November 6, 1922, in Mecklenburg, North Carolina, his father, John, was 32 and his mother, Hazel, was 27. He had one brother and one sister. He died on June 14, 2001, in Charlotte, North Car olina, at the age of 78, and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Charlotte, North Carolina.  His wife, Margaret Woods was born on October 10, 1927, in Forsyth, North Carolina. She died in 1983 in Charlotte, North Carolina, at the age of 56, and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Charlotte, North Carolina.
2.  Hugh Martin Tillett

OBITUARY:  The Daily Herald,  June 26, 2008

Hugh Martin Tillett was born July 31, 1925, in Charlotte. He served in the Navy in World War II and graduated from UNC Chapel Hill with a Bachelor of Science in Commerce. From 1949 to 1963, he was with Manufacturers Hanover Bank (then the fourth biggest bank in the country) in New York, in charge of its business in the Carolinas, Maryland and Virginia.

In 1963, Hugh moved his family to Charlotte, where he owned and operated a textile chemical company with his brother, John Tillett Jr., in nearby Pineville. In 1986, when his brother wanted to retire, Hugh obtained his broker's license and ran his own firm in Charlotte, a general brokerage business in real estate, for nine years.

His wife, Caroline Long Tillett, owned property in Brunswick County, Va., which included a 200-year-old farm house that Hugh once remarked “doesn't look a day older than 100.” Hugh and Caroline spent some 15 years remodeling and refurbishing the house, and it is now entered in the Virginia Landmark Register and the National Register of Historic Homes. He and Caroline moved into the old house in 1995 and shortly thereafter, Hugh joined Tanglewood Realty, where he became a top producer almost from the start, selling property primarily on and off Lake Gaston. In 1998, he listed and sold the first $1 million-plus home and property on the lake.

Hugh is survived by his wife, Caroline Long Tillett; his two sons, Hugh Martin Tillett Jr. of Ashville and Thomas Mason Tillett of Valentines, Va.; four grandchildren, Hugh Martin Tillett III of Asheville, Calder Womble Tillett of Charlotte, DeWitt Hanes Tillett, who attends the University of the South in Tennessee, and Thomas Mason Tillett Jr., who attends Washington and Lee University in Virginia; and a sister, Caroline Tillett Bailey, of California.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 29, at Lakeside Lutheran Church, with Pastor Fred Eichner officiating. The family will receive friends following services at the residence, 1050 Christanna Highway, Valentines.

A graveside service was held at 2 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 30, at Evergreen Cemetery in Charlotte. The family received friends following services at the Renaissance Charlotte Suites Hotel in the Southpark area.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Union Mission, 1310 Roanoke Ave., Roanoke Rapids NC 27870.

Wrenn, Clarke & Hagan Funeral Home is taking care of arrangements.

BRUNSWICK COUNTY, Va. — Caroline Moncure Long Tillett died peacefully Monday, Jan. 18, 2010, in the family home she loved so much in Brunswick County, Va.

She was born Sept. 23, 1925, in Roanoke Rapids Hospital and baptized at All Saints Episcopal Church in Roanoke Rapids. Caroline was an avid golfer, gardener, church volunteer, wife and mother. She leaves behind a large extended family that she treasured, and numerous friends and friendships she made over her long and fruitful life.

She was the daughter of Caroline Clarkson Moncure and Willie Jones Long. She was married to Hugh Martin Tillett for more than 55 years. Hugh preceded her in death in 2008.

She was born and raised at “Longview” Northampton County. She graduated from St. Margaret’s School in Tappahannock, Va., in 1943; St. Mary’s Junior College in 1943; and from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1947. After she married Hugh, they lived in New York City and Long Island, and then Charlotte. In 1995 they moved to Brunswick County to restore and live in the original homeplace of her great-grandfather, Judge Thomas Williams Mason.

She is survived by her two sons, Hugh Martin Tillett Jr. and Thomas Mason Tillett; and her four grandchildren, Calder Womble Tillett, DeWitt Hanes Tillett, Thomas Mason Tillett Jr. and Hugh Martin Tillett III.

A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 21, at Lakeside Lutheran Church on Lake Gaston, with the Rev. Fred C. Eichner officiating. The family will receive friends immediately following the service at the residence, 1050 Christanna Highway, Valentines, Va.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Memorial Fund of Lakeside Lutheran Church, 2427 Eaton Ferry Road, Littleton NC 27850.

Wrenn, Clarke & Hagan Funeral and Cremation Service in Roanoke Rapids is handling the arrangements.

Mason–Tillett House, also known as Rock Hill, Mason's, Long's Farm, and Brunswick Plantation, is a historic plantation house located at ValentinesBrunswick County, Virginia. It was built about 1780, and is a T-shaped, two-story frame structure with a 1 1/2-story addition added about 1832.

 

The front facade features a two-story pedimented porch. The interior features exceptional surviving grained and marbleized woodwork.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004

Restored by Hugh and Caroline Moncure Long Tillett.

Hugh Martin Tillett and Caroline Moncure Long  had two sons:
1.  Hugh Martin Tillett Jr.
Hugh Martin Tillett Jr.   He married Claire Huntley.
 
2.  Thomas Mason Tillett
Thomas Mason Tillett  He married Kathryn Miller Harris on October 21, 1995, in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina.
1.  Caroline McRae Tillett
Caroline MeRae Tillett was born on October 17, 1928, in North Carolina, her father, John, was 38, and her mother, Hazel, was 33. She had two brothers.  No further information.

Folger family   7 May 2016

 

Wilma Inez on left. Karoline, Spencer, Alice l to r

Laura Elizabeth Tillett
Laura Elizabeth Tillett was born on April 20, 1904, in Charlotte, North Carolina, her father, Charles, was 46, and her mother, Carrie, was 43. She married Philip Osborne Bethea on October 15, 1926, in her hometown. She died on October 28, 1989, in Charlotte, North Carolina, at the age of 85, and was buried there.
Philip Osborne Bethea was born on October 15, 1900, in Dillon, South Carolina, his father, William, was 31 and his mother, Georgia, was 28. He married Laura Elizabeth Tillett on October 15, 1926, in Charlotte, North Carolina. He died on April 29, 1979, in Charlotte, North Carolina, at the age of 78, and was buried there.

William Smith Tillett

Birth: Jul. 10, 1892

Death: Apr. 4, 1974


US Vetran WWI 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Dorothy Stockbridge Tillett (1896 - 1983)*
 

Burial:

Hillside Cemetery 
Deer Isle
Hancock County
Maine, USA

Dorothy Stockbridge Tillett

 

​Birth: Jun. 28, 1896

Death: Nov. 21, 1983


 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  William Smith Tillett (1892 - 1974)

 

Burial:
Hillside Cemetery 
Deer Isle
Hancock County
Maine, USA

Dorothy Stockbrodge Biography – The Writer-  (John Stephen Strange)

Dorothy Stockbridge Tillet unsuccessfully published a collection of poetry in 1920. She then adopted the pseudonym of John Stephen Strange and turned to the detective novel where she gave intrigues that touched sometimes the whodunit , sometimes the thriller .

In 1925, with his first title, Revenge of a Policeman, appeared a first recurring hero the detective Van Dusen Ormsberry. Seconded by young Bill Adams, this meticulous detective manages to solve the mystery that has plagued the murder of financier Fortescue for two years and finds the culprit of the death of a reputed criminologist on a bus. Strange still offers two puzzles of classic whodunits at Ormsberry before abandoning him for Barney Gantt, a likable photographer who won the Pulitzer Prize , who returns to eight highly complex surveys whose stories glare a bit at the black romance and above all To the thriller with stories of abductions and ransoms.

The Accused , one of the eight recurring novels of John Stephen Stange, recounts the surprising story of Judge Bardoley confronted with his past when he takes charge of a case where the accused is a former youthful flame. This time, the plot recalls the style of John Dickson Carr , notably the novel Judge Ireton is accused , without Strange's novel suffering from comparison.

John Stephen Strange was the pen name of Dorothy Stockbridge Tillett, who wrote 22 mystery novels for the Crime Club published from 1928 to 1976. All of her books have been out of print for many years now, and recently we have decided to reprint them mostly unabridged, but with added annotations for today's readers to enjoy these thrilling stories.
Dorothy Stockbridge Tillett was born in 1896 in New York, where she lived for most of her life. She published poetry in various magazines in the late 1910's, which were compiled into a book in 1920. She was a playwright of one-acts, often performing in her own plays. In 1928 she began her mystery-writing career with her first novel for the newly formed Crime Club, The Man Who Killed Fortescue. She maintained the secret of her true identity through the 48 years she published under the name John Stephen Strange, finally retiring from writing with the publication of her last novel, The House on 9th Street in 1976. Dorothy died in Connecticut in 1983.

Douglas Guernsey MacAgy

Birth: Jun. 8, 1913

Death: Sep. 6, 1973

Burial:
Hillside Cemetery 
Deer Isle
Hancock County
Maine, USA

Elizabeth Tillett MacAgy

Birth: Mar. 6, 1930

Death: Aug. 31, 1980

Burial:
Hillside Cemetery 
Deer Isle
Hancock County
Maine, USA

Douglas G. MacAgy Dies at 60; Hirshhorn Exhibitions Curator

SPECIAL TO THE NEW YORK TIMESSEPT. 7, 1973

WASHINGTON, Sept. 6 —Douglas G. MacAgy, who as curator of exhibitions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden of the Smithsonian Institution was preparing for the opening of its collection of modern sculpture next spring, died today in Georgetown University Hospital after suffering a heart attack last month. He was 60 years old.

A noted arranger of exhibitions, Mr. MacAgy had been deputy chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts from 1968 until he took the Hirshhorn post last year.

A native of Winnipeg, he studied at the University of Toronto, the Barnes Foundation, the Courtauld Institute of the University of London, the University of Pennsylvania, the Cleveland School of Art and Case Western Reserve University.

From assistant's role in Cleveland, Mr. MacAgy went to the San Francisco Museum of Art in 1941 as assistant curator and later curator. He gave his philosophy of exhibiting contemporary art that year in a letter to The New York Times: “To show as much as possible, and to select its exhibitions in accordance with various points of view.”

Later Mr. MacAgy was a special consultant to the director of the Museum of Modern Art and from 1959 to 1963 director of the Dallas Museum of Contemporary Arts. He had also arranged special exhibitions for UNESCO in New York, for both the Contemporary Arts and Fine Arts Museums in Houston, the AlbrightKnox Art Gallery in Buffalo and the Corcoran Gallery in, Washington.

Surviving are his window, the former Elizabeth Tillett; a daughter, Caitlin; a son, Ian; and his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Guernsey MacAgy of Toronto.

A funeral will be held here Tuesday at noon in St. Alban's Episcopal Church.

A BRIEF BIOGRAPHY

Douglas  MacAgy    (1913  ~  1973)

MacAgy changed museums from mausoleums to happenings. He was on the cutting edge of modern art movements from American abstract expressionism to conceptualism. MacAgy fought as an independent educator against the forces using art for political ends. His friends were the great artists of his day, including Clyfford Still and Marcel Duchamp. Only his first wife Jermayne rivaled him as an installer of art. (They were divorced in 1954.) Canadian born, he was international in his influence. From a privileged student at the Barnes Foundation through innovative years at the San Francisco Museum of Art, as Director at the California School of Fine Arts from 1945-50 when he was the catalyst for the advent of American abstraction, as curator at MOMA, as the spirit behind the modern art movement in Dallas, as the interpreter of European art to America, to the head of the National Endowment for the Arts, MacAgy taught the public and shaped the culture.

Douglas Guernsey MacAgy (circus hat) 1962

Dallas Museum of Contemporary Art, Dallas Texas

DMCA (Dallas Museum of Contemporary Art) Director Douglas MacAgy as Ringmaster for the Arts of the Circus preview party, 1962 Photo credit: Paul Rogers Harris

JERMAYNE MACAGY

Jermayne MacAgy (February 14, 1914 - 1964) was an American art museum specialist and professor. McAgy was born on February 14, 1914 in Cleveland, Ohio. Her father was Worthington H. and mother Rose Kathryne Noble. She received a B.A. in art history from Radcliffe College in 1935. MacAgy spent 1936 and 1937 in graduate school at Harvard University, the second of these two years devoted entirely to Professor Paul Sachs’ now famous class “Museum Work and Museum Problems” taught at Harvard’s Fogg Art Museum. She continued her graduate work at Western Reserve University (now Case Western Reserve University) where she studied the philosophy and psychology of art with Thomas Munro as a mentor. She gained her doctorate in philosophy at Western Reserve University with a dissertation on the folk art of the Western Reserve territory of Ohio. She then started her career in the education department of the Cleveland Museum of Art and worked there from 1939 - 1941. She met Douglas MacAgy at the Cleveland Museum of art and in 1941 they married. Although they later divorced, she used his name until her death. Shortly before their marriage, the San Francisco Museum of Art had hired Douglas MacAgy as an Assistant Curator, and in March of that year Jermayne and Douglas moved to San Francisco.

 

Career

MacAgy worked at the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco for 14 years. Over the span of that time she held "positions ranging from curator to acting director" (Herbert 1998, pp. 31–32). Throughout her career at the Legion of Honor she established a reputation for her exhibitions that were presented in a new and dramatic style, as well as her focus on the museum's educational outreach.

In 1955, she became the director of the Contemporary Arts Association of Houston. There she "reinvented the space," especially by her use of new and diverse platforms of display that "included potted plants, beds of gravel and bark, temporary partitions, scrims, theatrical lighting, and pedestals of all shapes and sizes combined in unusual ways" (Herbert 1998, p. 32). Her exhibitions at the Contemporary Arts Association include Mark Rothko in 1957, "The Trojan Horse: The Art of the Machine" in 1958, "The Common Denominator: Modern Design, 3500 BC- 1958 AD" in 1958, and "Romantic Agony: From Goya to de Kooning" in 1959. In 1959, she mounted her first exhibition at Mies van der Rohe's Cullinan Hall, a new wing of Houston's Museum of Fine Arts designed by Mies van der Rohe: "Totems Not Taboo: An Exhibition of Primitive Art," which earned accolades from Buckminster Fuller and Rene d'Harnoncourt, director of the Museum of Modern Art. In 1959, she left the Contemporary Arts Association to "teach art history and curate exhibitions for the University of St. Thomas" (Herbert 1998, p. 32).